Five Things Friday – September 12

1) As summer starts to wind down, it’s good to take advantage of all the local farmers’ markets while we still have them! This weekend offers us many options around the region. Today you can visit the Canton Farmers’ Market in downtown Canton, across from First Presbyterian Church of Canton, 17 Park St., from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be veggies, local fruits, honey, eggs, meats, baked goods and entertainment. For more information, contact Zoe Baker at 244-8475. Tomorrow you can check out the Lowville Farmers’ Market at the Lewis County Fairgrounds, 5485 Bostwick St., from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. There you’ll find homegrown produce and fruits, as well as handmade crafts, baked goods and more. For more information, call 783-8642 or e-mail chrisloyegy@hotmail.com.  Other markets on Saturday are: Cape Vincent Farmers’ Market, sponsored by the Cape Vincent Chamber of Commerce, starting at 8 a.m. at the Village Green, 654-2418 for more information; Ogdensburg Green Market, from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. at Library Park, 300 Block Riverside Avenue, 393-3620 for more information. On Sunday, you can head to the Massena Farmers’ Market, at the Triple A Building Supply Parking Lot, 3 Malby Ave., Massena. The Massena market is open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information, contact Shirley Peck at 769-5322 or e-mail shirleypeck25@yahoo.com. For more information about farms in Northern New York, visit GardenShare’s website.

2) After finding all that great local food, it’s time to work it off; and why not work it off for a cause? This weekend, there are a couple ways to stay in shape while raising money and awareness. On Saturday and Sunday, Sackets Harbor is home to the first ever Incredoubleman Triathlon. Offered throughout the weekend are a few options of running, swimming and biking races, and athletes can pick and choose to compete in any combination. Click here to read about how Diane Casselberry is raising awareness for ALS in this event. Online registration is now closed, but you can register in person today or before the events on Saturday and Sunday. On Saturday, St. Lawrence NYSARC is holding its seventh annual Autism Awareness Walk at 10 a.m. in the Village Park on Main St., Canton. This is a non-competitive walk to spread awareness about Autism and the support services offered by St. Lawrence NYSARC. There is no minimum entry fee for this event. For more details, check out their website, or contact Michelle Quinell-Gayle, Assistant Executive Director of Community Relations, at 315-386-3529 or mquinell@slnysarc.org.

3) Next up on the list is art! Venditti Vineyards, 42780 New Connecticut Rd., Theresa, is hosting “Music in the Vineyard” this evening from 6 to 9 p.m. Bring some of your farmers’ market finds and a blanket or some chairs, and enjoy the music and sangria! There is no cover charge. Today at 4 p.m., View Arts Center, 3273 Rt. 28, Old Forge, is hosting an artist talk and reception for Mario Davalos, photographer from the Dominican Republic, and Eileen Feeney Bushnell, printmaker and professor of art at Rochester Institute of Technology. The event is free. Can’t make it out this afternoon? Don’t sweat it; the artists’ works will be on display through January 4. A third art option is “Death of a Salesman,” the Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award winning Arthur Miller play, playing at 7:30 p.m. at Pendragon Theatre, 15 Brandy Brook Ave., Saranac Lake. Tickets are $22; senior citizens and students, $20; children 16 and younger, $18. For tickets and more information, call Pendragon Theatre at 1-518-891-1854. 

4) What better way to spend your weekend than by checking out the local festivals? This year marks the Italian-American Civic Association’s 30th annual Bravo Italiano Festival.  The festival, held at the Alex T. Duffy Fairgrounds, Watertown, spans the weekend, with events happening each day, including comedy, music, a Miss Italia Pageant, bocce tournament and, of course, food! For a complete schedule and prices, see their 2014 Events Calendar. Also taking place this weekend is the Stone Mills Agricultural Museum‘s 10th annual Harvest Festival and Pork Roast Dinner, on Sunday from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. at Stone Mills Agricultural Museum, 30950 Rt. 180. The festival offers scarecrow making, cake walk, vendors, animals, games and more, as well as a dinner at noon for $10. For more information, call 658-2353.

5) A last offering this weekend is rummage sales! The Calvary Assembly of God in Carthage, 10 Martin Street Rd., is holding an indoor rummage sale today and tomorrow, from 8 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. each day. There will be clothing, furniture, decorations, household goods, baby items, homemade food and baked goods. The proceeds go to Mountain Movers Youth Group. For more information, call 767-2874 or 771-8093. If you’re in the Canton area, you can stop by First Presbyterian Church‘s fall rummage sale until 5 p.m. today, and from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. tomorrow, located at 17 Park St., Canton. You’ll be able to find book-to-school, fall and winter clothes, and on Saturday, there will be a “store” grocery bag sale. For more information, contact Ellen Grayson at 323-5669, Pat Mace at 386-2768 or Jane Fernandes at 322-2441. Lastly, Little Sisters Inn, 35802 State Rt. 3, Herrings, is holding a community garage sale tomorrow from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. to benefit Friends of the Library. Come take a look at the offerings of furniture, books and antiques. Refreshments will be available. For more information, call 519-1280.

Have a fun-filled weekend!

North Country Family Health Center opens Lowville site

Julie McDermott is facilities manager at the new Lowville site of the North Country Family Health Center at Lewis County General Hospital. Norm Johnston / NNY Living

Julie McDermott is facilities manager at the new Lowville site of the North Country Family Health Center at Lewis County General Hospital. Norm Johnston / NNY Living

The North Country Family Health Center now offers medical, dental and behavioral health services at its Lewis County General Hospital site.

Executive Director Joey Marie Horton said the 7785 N. State St. site, which is co-located with the nonprofit’s office for the Women, Infants and Children federal supplemental feeding program, will be open on a limited basis, from 8 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays.

A celebratory opening will take place at 8:30 a.m. Sept. 16 in the clinic, which is in the rear wing of the hospital. [Read more…]

Flower Memorial Library entrance opened after two years

A boy stands next to the newly re-opened Flower Library entrance, which had been closed for two years due to multiple rehabilitation projects. Amanda Morrison / NNY Living

A boy stands next to the newly re-opened Flower Library entrance, which had been closed for two years due to multiple rehabilitation projects. Amanda Morrison / NNY Living

Visitors to the Roswell P. Flower Memorial Library, after more than two years, can once again walk up the marble walkway, past the working marble fountains and the lion sculptures, and enter into the library’s iconic rotunda.

The entrance reopening follows the completion of a rehabilitation of the library’s exterior.

“It looks so beautiful. All the marble has all been cleaned up and the fountains are working again,” said reference librarian Yvonne F. Reff. “People are so used to not using it, just want to tell everyone come in and use it, again.”

Executive Library Director Margaret J. Waggoner said there was no celebration, no balloons, or really any formal recognition to the opening on Tuesday afternoon.

“A maintenance man came over and told me the doorway was good to go,” Mrs. Waggoner said.

With that, the yellow tape that had blocked the door and the chain blocking the marble walkway were removed. [Read more…]

Backpack, school supplies, clothing voucher giveaway continues today

Teens look at school supplies during the Salvation Army and Watertown Urban Mission voucher giveaway program held this year at the Salvation Army on State Street. Norm Johnston / NNY Living

Teens look at school supplies during the Salvation Army and Watertown Urban Mission voucher giveaway program held this year at the Salvation Army on State Street. Norm Johnston / NNY Living

Hundreds of local families will be able to start the 2014-15 school year off with less of a financial burden from school supplies and clothing needs.

Beginning at 8 a.m. Tuesday, those families lined up at the Watertown Salvation Army, 723 State St., for the annual distribution day of gently used or new backpacks full of starter kits of school supplies collected by the Watertown Urban Mission. The mission’s staple summer program included the Watertown Salvation Army this year, to offer vouchers for clothing at the Salvation Army Family Store, Route 3.

Mission Director of Development Andrew G. Mangione said this is the first time the two nonprofits formed a back-to-school partnership to co-locate school assistance initiatives. He added the event would not be possible, however, without the generosity of local residents, businesses and churches donating items.

“Donors have been responding to Facebook messages and other appeals, meeting the needs that have been changing through this process,” he said. “The biggest demand in the last couple of years is kindergarten through third grade and seventh through 12th grade backpacks. We probably have enough supplies for a hundred backpacks.” [Read more…]

SUNY Canton president answers Clarkson University Ice Bucket Challenge (VIDEO)

Clarkson University’s freshman class takes the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge Sunday outside of Cheel Arena in Potsdam. Melanie Kimbler-Lago / NNY Living

Clarkson University’s freshman class takes the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge Sunday outside of Cheel Arena in Potsdam. Melanie Kimbler-Lago / NNY Living

Grinning from ear to ear, SUNY Canton President Dr. Zvi Szafran became the second north country college president to take the ALS ice bucket challenge Monday, responding to a challenge from more than 700 Clarkson freshmen who endured the plunge Sunday.

Before getting wet, he challenged his fellow SUNY presidents to do the same, saying he was more than happy to do his part to battle a disease that has affected many.

Mr. Szafran was soaked by college mascot Roody Roo, who slowly poured a 5-gallon bucket of water chock full of ice over his head in front of SUNY Canton’s Miller Campus Center.

“They say the wet head is dead, but it really is not,” he said, joking that the mascot was cruel in taking his time.

Mr. Szafran promised to make a donation to the foundation for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s Disease, though he isn’t sure yet how much he will give. “After all that ice, my assets are frozen,” he said. [Read more…]

‘What to Expect’ series author visits new mothers at north country hospitals

Heidi E. Murkoff, author of the ‘What to Expect Series,’ smiles while being introduced to baby Gabriella by her mother Alissa Stanford, while Mrs. Murkoff was on a tour of the maternity ward at Samaritan Medical Center. Amanda Morrison / NNY Living

Heidi E. Murkoff, author of the ‘What to Expect Series,’ smiles while being introduced to baby Gabriella by her mother Alissa Stanford, while Mrs. Murkoff was on a tour of the maternity ward at Samaritan Medical Center. Amanda Morrison / NNY Living

Heidi E. Murkoff offered more to new mothers Thursday than advice in her “What to Expect” book series on prenatal and postnatal years.

Conversation came after warm hugs during visits to maternity units at Carthage Area Hospital and Samaritan Medical Center. “I can’t get enough,” she said, regarding greeting just-born babies and their families. “This has been awesome.”

Surprised at how busy Carthage Area Hospital was as a small community hospital, Mrs. Murkoff said her visit to Samaritan Medical Center also was busy. There were 20 patients Thursday at Samaritan alone, according to certified lactation counselor Daniele Banks.

Mrs. Murkoff and her husband, Erik, have partnered with the United Service Organization for the Special Delivery Program, where baby shower events are hosted to bring military families together. Mrs. Murkoff’s north country stay will continue today with participation in a baby shower with 100 expectant military mothers.

What’s particularly unique about this visit, Mrs. Murkoff said, is up until now she has not been to a community-based hospital that served a large population of military families.

“Hospitals are normally on the base,” she said.

Just three hours after military spouse Alissa Stanford gave birth via Cesarian section to daughter Gabriella, Mrs. Murkoff got to spend time with the family, including her husband Christopher and big brother Christopher, 9, in the recovery room. “She’s brand new,” Mrs. Murkoff said of the 6-pound, 9-ounce girl, as she signed a copy of her “What to Expect The First Year.” [Read more…]

Classic automobile fans enjoy sixth annual Brasher car show

People meander around, checking out vintage cars Wednesday at the Super Cruise In Classic Car Show in Brasher Falls. Melanie Kimbler-Lago / NNY Living

People meander around, checking out vintage cars Wednesday at the Super Cruise In Classic Car Show in Brasher Falls. Melanie Kimbler-Lago / NNY Living

The automobile industry was well represented Wednesday in Brasher Falls as cars from the Roaring 20s, the World War II era, and the groovy ’60s and ’70s were among the vehicles on display for the annual car show.

The sixth edition of the Super Cruise In and Car Show featured more than 130 glistening in the bright sun, quickly overflowing the Brasher municipal building parking lot.

“(There’s) no criteria. You can bring in anything that’s a semi-classic or a car that you want to show,” town Supervisor M. James Dawson said. “Most of them are classics or semi-classics. We started this show six years ago, and I decided to have (them) on Wednesday afternoon. Somebody said, ‘You’ve got to be crazy. Nobody’s going to go to a car show in the evening,’ and I said, ‘Well, let’s just try it.’ We decided not to have any judging. There are no trophies handed out; it doesn’t cost the people that bring their cars. Most car shows, you have to pay a fee to get in.”

Those who bring cars to the Brasher show are given tickets for a free meal provided by the Quad Town Lions Club. [Read more…]

Jefferson Community College opens its first dormitory

College President Carol M. McCoy addresses the large crowd of people attending a ribbon cutting ceremony for the East Hall dormitory at Jefferson Community College on Monday. Amanda Morrison / NNY Living

College President Carol M. McCoy addresses the large crowd of people attending a ribbon cutting ceremony for the East Hall dormitory at Jefferson Community College on Monday. Amanda Morrison / NNY Living

After five years of planning, the first dormitory at Jefferson Community College was opened Monday afternoon with a ribbon-cutting ceremony and a picnic.

“Wow, is this not a truly incredible facility? Yes, I’m clapping for my building,” said college President Carole A. McCoy. “In 2008 we put a bold statement in our brand new strategic plan. That statement read ‘Initiative 1.6 : create a residential experience for students that promotes academic achievement and social development.’ I don’t think that any of us could picture the road that we would go down to get from making that statement to this reality.”

The ribbon-cutting was attended by more than 100 people, including students, faculty and interested members of the general public. It was the official opening of East Hall, JCC’s new 294-bed residence hall. Those in attendance were able to take the first look inside the open- concept lobby, classroom space, study space and “Tech Nook” with seven computers and a printer, and dorm rooms.

The 98,000-square-foot, $17 million facility provides JCC students with on-campus housing for the first time. The college, one of 64 campuses including 30 community colleges in the State University of New York system, was founded in 1961.

A presentation was given by several speakers before the ribbon cutting. They included Mrs. McCoy; Jack N. Donato, president of the Faculty Student Association board of directors; Joseph J. LaClair, past president of the Jefferson Community College Foundation board; Mark Purcell, owner of Purcell Construction Corp.; Hollis C. Harrington, resident assistant and second-year JCC student; and Betsy D. Penrose, vice president for students.

“The opening of East Hall is a day that will long be talked about in the campus history,” said Mrs. McCoy. “It will be seen as a transformative event that brought about an enhanced learning environment on campus, increased student success and furthered Jefferson Community College as the college of choice for the north country. To all of you, thank you again — we couldn’t have done it without every single one of you.” [Read more…]

Father of Amish girls feels sorry for suspects in kidnapping case

A group of Amish boys dressed in their Sunday best walk along Mount Alone Road in Heuvelton. Melanie Kimbler-Lago / NNY Living

A group of Amish boys dressed in their Sunday best walk along Mount Alone Road in Heuvelton. Melanie Kimbler-Lago / NNY Living

The father of two Amish girls who allegedly were abducted last week said Sunday that he feels sorry for the two people charged and jailed in connection with the incident.

The girls, ages 12 and 6, disappeared from the family’s roadside vegetable stand Wednesday evening, setting off a statewide Amber Alert and sparking nationwide concern. The girls were returned home about 24 hours after they disappeared.

Stephen M. Howells II, 39, and Nicole F. Vaisey, 25, both of 1380 County Route 21 in Hermon, were arraigned Friday on two counts each of first-degree kidnapping, with the intent to inflict physical injury or sexually violate or sexually abuse the girls.

In an interview with Johnson Newspapers in their Heuvelton home on Sunday, the girls’ father — Mose Miller, 44 — said he feels “sorry” for the suspects.

“It’s sad,” Mr. Miller said. “They must have ruined their whole life.”

His wife, Barbara Miller, 43, said she is grateful to have her girls back home, but daily life has not yet returned to normal at the two-story white farmhouse they share with their 14 children on Mount Alone Road, a narrow dead-end road off state Route 812.

“We feel relieved we have them. It’s still not like it was,” she said.

The couple did not express any anger toward the suspects, Mr. Howells and Ms. Vaisey. [Read more…]

Massena Rescue Squad and dive team save life of dog at Robert Moses State Park

Camping at Robert Moses State Park for the first time, the Caron family from St. Philippe, Quebec has had an exciting trip. After arriving at the campgrounds on Sunday the family’s truck broke down and on Wednesday their dog, ran into the river and got stuck in the current, resulting in a dramatic rescue that involved the Massena Rescue Squad’s dive team, a capsized canoe, and a second canoe coming the rescue of those in the first canoe. Front, Elizabeth Caron, 8; second row, Matthyeu Caron, 12 and Aku; back row, Melissa Matson, of Massena, Diana D. Eldridge and her husband, Eric Caron. Benny Fairchild / NNY Living

Camping at Robert Moses State Park for the first time, the Caron family from St. Philippe, Quebec has had an exciting trip. After arriving at the campgrounds on Sunday the family’s truck broke down and on Wednesday their dog, ran into the river and got stuck in the current, resulting in a dramatic rescue that involved the Massena Rescue Squad’s dive team, a capsized canoe, and a second canoe coming the rescue of those in the first canoe. Front, Elizabeth Caron, 8; second row, Matthyeu Caron, 12 and Aku; back row, Melissa Matson, of Massena, Diana D. Eldridge and her husband, Eric Caron. Benny Fairchild / NNY Living

A family from St. Philippe, Quebec, is wrapping up a camping trip they will never forget after nearly losing their dog Wednesday afternoon at Robert Moses State Park.

The chocolate lab, named Aku, escaped from his owners, Eric Caron and his wife, Diana D. Eldridge, shortly after 2:30 p.m. He made a run from the family’s campsite straight into the St. Lawrence River, where he got stuck in a current near a buoy about 50 yards from the shore.

Mr. Caron said his initial thought was to swim out to the dog, but he quickly realized Aku was too far out into the river for him to make it without a boat. He then ran back from the shoreline to his canoe.

He was joined by Melissa Matson of Massena, a camper from a neighboring site who saw the dog in trouble. They made their way into the river.

But en route to Aku, the canoe capsized, stranding Mr. Caron and Ms. Matson in water over their heads.

That’s when Ms. Eldridge sprang into action, grabbing another canoe and heading out to rescue her husband and Ms. Matson.

Mr. Caron and Ms. Eldridge — who were joined on the trip by their two children, Elizabeth Caron, 8 and Matthyeu Caron, 12 — said they were worried that Aku wasn’t going to make it out of the river alive.

“We were worried,” Ms. Eldridge said. “We thought they would find him at the bottom of the river.”

But, after watching her husband’s canoe capsize, Ms. Eldridge said the dog became a secondary concern.

“I wasn’t thinking. I was just looking for a boat,” she said. “I said, ‘I may not be much, but I can row.’”

Ms. Matson reflects she is glad the canoe capsized when it did. “If we would have made it to the dog, we would have capsized for sure,” she said, noting they would have been in even deeper water and with an even stronger current.

Another camper, witnessing the canoe capsize, called 911. The Massena Rescue Squad and its dive team, as well as the fire department, were dispatched to the scene.

Rescue Squad Chief Norm F. Worden said volunteers launched the squad’s Zodiac rescue boat from the park’s boat launch and then headed toward the dog.

“It took us a few minutes to get there, because our larger rescue boat, which is normally in the water at the Barnhart Marina, was out of service,” Mr. Worden said, adding that when the team finally reached the dog, they found an animal that was exhausted but still fighting to stay afloat.

“He was swimming and treading water, but he was getting tired,” Mr. Worden said. “He was glad to see the guys when we got there.”

The dog was pulled from the water at roughly 3:15 p.m. — nearly 45 minutes after he entered the water.

Meanwhile, watching the whole ordeal from the shore were Elizabeth and Matthyeu, who both admitted to being scared. “He loves to swim,” Matthyeu said.

His mother added the family does its best to keep Aku out of the pool when at home.

“He’ll swim until he sinks down to the bottom of the pool,” Ms. Eldridge said.

The family met Ms. Matson on Wednesday morning and even had a conversation about each family’s respective dog.

Still wearing clothes wet from when the canoe capsized, Ms. Matson said, should the same situation arise again, she wouldn’t think twice about helping another animal in need.

“I would do it all over again in a heartbeat,” she said. “I have a big love for animals. I like animals more than I like most people.”

Ms. Matson, who said she camps at the park every year, said the incident is something that could have happened to anyone.

“We’ve all done it,” she said, referring to families letting their dogs run free and play while camping. If it had been her dog — a Jack Russell terrier — stuck in the river, Ms. Matson said, she doubts the story would have had a happy ending.

“My dog wouldn’t have made it,” she said. “I got to meet some really nice people and the dog was saved, so it was a good day.”

For the Caron family, their first camping trip at Robert Moses State Park is one they’ll never forget.

Mr. Caron said after the family arrived at the park on Sunday, their truck broke down, but park staff were able to help him with repairs so he could get it running again and to a local garage.

“The one thing we’ve learned from this is people from Massena are very generous and unselfish,” Ms. Eldridge said. “This was our first trip here, but it won’t be our last.”

When asked if Aku would join the family when they return to Massena, Ms. Eldridge replied, “We’ll bring him back.”

“With a really good leash,” her husband added.

 

By Benny Fairchild, Johnson Newspapers