The fine art of ‘slow gifting’ for the creative souls on your list

Kari Zelson Robertson

Kari Zelson Robertson

Like it says in the song, there’s nothing like the real thing, baby. Diamonds? Puppies? Even food is tastier and better for you when made from materials that are close to the source. In Italy, they call it the “Slow Food” movement. It’s catching on here, too, as we start to appreciate regional traditions and locally available ingredients. We want to know from where, who, and by what processes our consumer items come to us.
In my world, this translates to my manmade surroundings. My home is more than 200 years old. The hand hewn timbers show the marks and some logs still have the bark on them. They tell a story of real people and naturally occurring materials. I also collect and proudly display art and craft work by people who I have met. Their stories are now part of my story and I enjoy their pieces every day.
In Alvin Toffler’s 1970 book, Future Shock, he predicted the stress induced by too much change in too short a time. He wrote about the downside of massive amounts of information piled upon us in our love affair with technology, overwhelming the human spirit. Interestingly, he also predicted a pendulum swing response, in the form of a renewed hunger for craft and art in the everyday.
Here in the north country, we are fortunate to live our own kind of slow movement. We take time to note and celebrate the beauty around us, to take time. This year, as you think about how you would like to embrace the season, I propose Slow Gifting, a movement toward finding authentic instead of mass-produced objects.
Seek out the creative makers in your area, and think about how their pieces can enhance quality of life for you and your friends and family. This is a perfect time to shop with an eye to regional tradition, authentic materials, and your entrepreneurial community. Have fun “slow gifting” this year. It will be memorable.

COOPERATIVES AND ARTS ORGANIZATIONS

These are one-stop-shops offering work by multiple artists at each location.

TAUNY

53 Main St., Canton

tauny.org

Bayhouse Artisans

21 James St., Alexandria Bay

bayhouseartisans.com

Fibonacci 321 Gallery

321 James St., Clayton

fibonacci321.com

North Country Arts Council

52 Public Square, Watertown

nnyart.org

Lake St. Lawrence Art Gallery

10 Main St., Waddington

 

INDIVIDUAL ARTIST STUDIOS

For the more adventurous and curious, here are a few favorites. The following are professionals who also have gallery and studio spaces that are worth investigating. Here, you have the opportunity to talk to the person who made the item, and to get personal assistance in learning about and choosing just the right thing.

Scott Ouderkirk, stained glass, illustration, 291 River Road, Hammond, glassgoat.com

Scott and his family run the art studio and sustainable farming project. They also keep bees, goats, and always have great projects in the queue.

Lisa Nortz, jeweler, 8270 Soft Maple Road, Croghan, silverbenchjewelry.com

A second-generation silversmith, Lisa does all sorts of things with silver. She hammers, bends, braids, solders and sets stones. You will say, “ah” as you wind your way through the woods to her place.

Greg Lago, printmaking and sculpture, 12975 House Road, Clayton, wingedbull.com

Greg is a Renaissance Man and knows at least a little bit about everything. He has a ton of information about local history that translates to his prints of scenes, stories, ideas about life. The work is truly magical, unusual in design and perspective. His workspace is off the beaten track, but only a few minutes from the village, and a very interesting location to soak in.

Larry Barone, painter, 115 W. Main St., Sackets Harbor, thegalleryfineart.com

Larry has been working as an artist nearly every day since retiring as an art educator. His pastels, mostly local scenery are nuanced, richly dimensional. He is a master. His bright and airy studio is on the main road in Sackets, where he always has a piece on the easel.

Cathie Ellsworth, clay, Paddock Art and Antiques, 1 Public Square, Suite 6, Watertown

Cathie makes lovely and unique hand-built serving bowls, platters and raku. Her daughter, Claire also sells drawings at the shop, with a focus on charcoal. Both women are certified art educators, with years of experience as trained artists. Their space is in the oldest covered mall in the United States, the Paddock Arcade.

Michael Ringer, painting, bronze sculpture and books, 47382 Dingman Point Road, Alexandria Bay, michaelringer.com

Michael, another former art educator, has been making art his full-time business since 1990. He has also published books of his work, highlighting life on the river.

ART TRAILS

In the third and final category, and panning further out, here are links to art trails, mapped overviews of the hotspots. These links throw open the doors to all sorts of local art world connections that are quietly bubbling around us:

NNY ART TRAIL

NNYArtTrail.com. New in 2016, this trail covers studios and galleries in Jefferson-Lewis-St. Lawrence counties.

SLCARTSCOUNCIL.ORG

Sponsored by the St. Lawrence Arts Councilin Potsdam, this trail covers artists in the St. Lawrence County region.

NORTHGUIDE.ORG

Initiated by the Adirondack North Country Association, this Art Trail covers everything north of Interstate 90 and east of Interstate 81. It is sortable by location, materials, name of artist and/or gallery.

 

Kari Zelson Robertson is a clay artist. Her studio is at 28279 state Route 126, Rutland Center. She makes sculpture to use, hand-built and wheel thrown serving bowls, vases and drinking vessels. Her studio is attached to her farmhouse. She runs a fair weather gallery next door, open by appointment in the fall and winter. Contact her at karizelsonrobertson.com.

Unchain your holiday season: Give the gifts of community craft, north country artisans

n1512p42001h

As the holidays draw near, finding the perfect gift can be a stressful and daunting task. But it doesn’t have to be. Thinking outside of the box stores and looking locally can ease this stress and even produce a custom gift for each person on your holiday shopping list.

Buying locally not only allows for you to find the perfectly customized gift for your loved ones it also supports your area small businesses, keeping Northern New York communities bustling with business and economic growth.

“Every purchase made locally results in funds going back into our economy,” said Greater Watertown-North Country Chamber executive director Kylie Peck. “The more we shop locally the more effect we have on those that are supporting local programs, non-profits and causes that mean the most to us”

Throughout Jefferson, Lewis and St. Lawrence Counties, many small businesses thrive due to support from local residents.

While shops along the St. Lawrence River depend on tourism during the summer months, they still remain open during the off-season; for small businesses in development it is about their passion for the products which they strive to share with their neighbors and friends.

“Of course it is very gratifying when people use and buy my products,” said Laura Cerow, owner and creator of St. Larry’s organic oils, lotions and potions, “Then they share with me how much they love them. But the most rewarding part is when someone finds relief of some kind from a product, that they had not been able to find elsewhere.  I also formulate for individual needs and I really enjoy that aspect as well.”

It is that personal relationship with local business owners that makes shopping locally a benefit to the consumer.

“We always encourage people to shop locally when they can. We are so fortunate in the greater Watertown area to be surrounded by quaint towns that offer unique shopping experiences. During the holiday season, the chamber acts as a neighborhood champion for the Small Business Saturday movement. For many year’s we have assisted with increasing awareness of this great program,” Mrs. Peck said.

Not only does shopping for the holidays within your local communities benefit the economy, but it helps the consumer save money as well. By shopping locally, you are saving on the cost of shipping and handling. Many online shops claim to provide free shipping during the holidays, but you are paying a higher price for that retail item.

Shopping during the holidays also should be a fun experience shared with friends and family. While browsing the internet from the comfort of home can be relaxing, having personal experiences and laughs while finding the perfect holiday gift can be exciting and create lasting memories.

Remember, your family and friends are one of a kind. Shopping locally means you can choose unique and one-of-a-kind gifts that are as special as the recipient.

NNY Living encourages you to focus your holiday shopping at many of the region’s small businesses this holiday season by following our non-chain holiday shopping guide below Holly’s Holiday Pick.

Holly’s holiday pick

gift-box-image-1With the holidays just around the corner it’s easy to forget to care for your personal health and wellness. Becoming overwhelmed with the hustle and bustle of shopping, hosting guests and family and preparing the big holiday meal can leave one feeling drained.

But you don’t have to let your personal well-being fall to the wayside by simply taking a few minutes to eat well and treat your body right. Three small business owners along the St. Lawrence River want to ensure that you do just that. Laura Cerow, owner of St. Larry’s, Monica Behan, owner of Modicum Skin Care, and Liz Price-Kellogg along with Kristen Taylor, creators of LIVE YUM, have developed the “Gratitude Goddess Holiday Gift Box” to assist with wellness during the holiday season.

Each gift box includes gratitude-inspiring products handcrafted along the St. Lawrence River from the local businesswomen.

LIVE YUM

A signed copy of “For the Love of Food and Yoga: A Celebration of Mindful Eating and Being,” by Liz Price-Kellogg and  Kristen Taylor. Plus, three new LIVE Yum recipes.

LARRY’S

Two organic essential oils from St. Larry’s, helmed by the St. Lawrence River’s remarkable Laura Cerow, that may be used in recipes from the For the Love of Food and Yoga inspirational cookbook.

MODICUM SKIN CARE

A travel size of the coveted Essential Serum from Murray Isle’s Monica Behan, owner of Modicum Skin Care! A 2015 Beauty Nominee for Martha Stewart’s American Made Awards, Modicum Skin Care nutrient system combats a multitude of skin care issues from aging to acne.

Call 523-0627 to purchase your holiday “Gratitude Goddess Holiday Gift Box” or to learn more. Each gift box is $50 to $65 value and includes sales tax. LIVE YUM will also mail your gift box to any mailing address with an enclosed LIVE YUM gift card (add $10 — flat rate for shipping). Give the gift of the river, health, wellness and gratitude this holiday season.

 

Jefferson County

Editor’s note: The following list of non-chain stores is not intended as an all-inclusive shopping directory.

Country Designs

320 Dodge Ave., Sackets Harbor

778-5633

St. Lawrence Pottery

41468 state Route 12, Clayton

686-4252

stlawrencepottery.com

The Lake Ontario Gift Shop

12279 state Route 12E, Chaumont

(315) 300-4014

The Natural Basket

44144 state Route 3, Natural Bridge

644-4821

Agape Shoppe

136 Court St., Watertown

788-7470

The 1000 Islands Cruet

226 James St., Clayton

767-1064

1000 Islands River Rat Cheese

242 James St., Clayton

686-2480 or 1- (800) 752-1341

riverratcheese.net

Treasure Island Jewelers

40 James St., Alexandria Bay

482-2294

treasureislands.net

Karla’s Christmas Shoppe

500 Riverside Drive, Clayton

686-1906

Captain Spicer’s Gallery

40467 state Route 12, Clayton

686-3419

Freighters of Clayton

534 Riverside Drive, Clayton

703-0166

St. Larry’s

38234 Windward Cliffs, Clayton

408-1174

stlarrysriver@gmail.com

stlarrys.com

Live Yum

Liz Price-Kellogg and

Kristen Taylor, Clayton

775-7115 or 523-0627

namaste@liveyum.com

liveyum.com

Modicum

Clayton / 1000 Islands

modicumskincare@gmail.com

modicumskincare.com

St. Lawrence County

Phil and Jackie’s

69 Main St., Massena

philandjackies.com

Nature’s Storehouse

21 Main St., Canton

386-3740

natures-storehouse.com

Seasons Specialty Gifts

27 W. Orvis St., Massena

764-7671

seasons-gifts.com

Misty Hollow

22 Market St., Potsdam

265-1660

mistyhollowcraftsandhobbies.com

St. Lawrence County Arts Council

41 Elm St., Room 231, Potsdam

(Downtown Snell Hall, 2nd Floor)

265-6860

slcartscouncil.org

Brick & Mortar Music

15 Market St., Potsdam

274-9311

bandmm.com

Adirondack Fragrance & Flavor Farm

1551 Highway 72, Potsdam

265-1776

adkfragrancefarm.com

Argent’s Jewelry and Coin Shop

32 Market St., Potsdam

265-6389

Canton-Potsdam Gift Shop

50 Leroy St., Canton

261-5415

Em Bears

P.O. Box 402, Hannawa Falls

268-1227

embears.com

Traditional Arts in Upstate New York (TAUNY) store

53 E. Main St., Canton

386-4289

tauny,org

Maple Run Emporiums Inc.

49 Market St., Potsdam

274-0102

MapleRunEmporiums.com

Lewis County

Nolts Country Store

7189 state Route 812, Lowville

377-3077

Marguerite’s Cranberry Emporium

7614 N. State St., Lowville

376-4411

mcegifts.com

Cozy Country Corner

7608 North State St., Lowville

376-4004

cozycountrycorner.lightspeedwebstore.com

Bonaparte Candle & Gifts

7790 State Route 3, Harrisville

543-7535

The Blue Bird Country Store

8311 state Route 26, Lowville

376-2473

bluebirdcandle.com

Amish Connection

9882 state Route 12, Copenhagen

688-2569

amishconnectionllc.com

Croghan Candy Kitchen

9740 state Route 812, Croghan

346-1591

Incorporate bright seasonal blooms in holiday decorating

 

As I move through local l_col_hallett_1116stores, preparing for the holiday season I notice displays of paperwhite and amaryllis bulbs. Growing or “forcing” these bulbs are excellent projects for young gardeners, for holiday hostess gifts, and for adding a natural element to your holiday decorating. Pots of flowering bulbs add a touch of cheerful color to a room and make wonderful eye-catching centerpieces for a holiday table whether you have a rustic or glittering theme.

Paperwhites belong to a group of daffodils that are not hardy for Northern New York gardens. But they grow easily in a pot indoors. Their large clusters of pure white flowers arch above green foliage, and their perfume fills a room with fragrance. Paperwhites require no preparation and are absolutely foolproof.

Plant paperwhite bulbs in the soil close together, but not touching and always plant the bulbs with the tip of the bulb growing toward the sky. The bulbs should be planted just below the surface of the soil to leave as much room as possible for rooting. Keep the pots in indirect light and evenly moist but not soggy. For best results, as the paperwhites set buds, move them to a brighter relatively cool location, as if the bulbs were outside in the spring, as buds develop and bloom. I found that paperwhites tend to get very tall and tip over in their pots. I like to plan and use a support for them. I think three to four birch sticks, red twig dogwood, or a coat hanger wire trimmed and wrapped in raffia or holiday ribbon looks nice.

Once they start to gain some height I tie them in with the raffia or garden twine. If you are not looking for a rustic natural look you can always use decorative or holiday ribbon to keep the leaves and blooms looking tidy. Gardeners often dispose of paperwhite bulbs after they finish blooming. With proper storage and care during the winter, however, your paperwhite bulbs will grow and flower again in two or three years. I keep bulbs wet thru winter and cut off spent blooms. I set my potted paperwhite bulbs outside in a shaded part of garden in the summer. Before the first frost, I cut back the green leaves, bring the bulbs in and store them in my basement and repot them about 6 weeks before Christmas time. Sometimes the bulbs will develop “sister” bulbs that can be carefully broken away and repotted as well.

Of all flowering bulbs, amaryllis bulbs are the easiest to bring to bloom. The amaryllis comes in many beautiful varieties including various shades of red, white, pink, salmon and orange. The amaryllis (hippeastrum) is a tender bulb that will bloom without special treatment when first purchased. The amaryllis is often thought of as blooming at Christmas, but they can be started at various times to have a continuous display of color. The planting period can range from October to April. The bulb is native to tropical and subtropical regions from Argentina north to Mexico and the Caribbean. The larger the bulb the more flowers will be produced and always store un-planted bulbs in a cool place between 40 and 50 degrees Fahrenheit.

When you are ready to plant place the base of the amaryllis bulb in lukewarm water for a few hours. The bulb should be potted up in a light, rich soil, a pro-mix in which you might start seeds, in a pot that is only 1 to 2 inches larger in diameter than the bulb. The upper half of the bulb should be exposed above soil and the roots should be down and in the soil. Press the soil around the bulb down firmly to set the bulb securely in place after planting. Initially, after planting water thoroughly, allow the soil to become quite dry. Water more frequently after the flower stalk appears, but never water when the soil is already damp or this will cause the bulb to rot. Put the plant in a warm, sunny spot until the flower buds show color, and then move it out of direct sunlight. You can place them on a table or other focal point to truly enjoy the show of color.

After blooming, cut off the flower stalk about 2 inches above the bulb to prevent seed formation. At this point, place it in the brightest possible location where it eventually has full sun for at least five hours daily. When the weather warms move it outside and fertilize it weekly with a household plant food as you would your window boxes and hanging baskets to build up the nutrients needed for blooming the following year. Amaryllis should be brought indoors before the first frost of fall. Traditionally, the bulb is then given a resting period by placing it in a dark location, withholding water and allowing the leaves to dry. The bulb may be forced into bloom again after resting eight weeks. If necessary, repot in a slightly larger container. If the pot is large enough, remove the upper 2 inches of soil and top-dress with fresh potting soil. This completes the cycle, which may be repeated annually for many years of lovely blooms.

Throughout the holiday season, pots of flowering potted bulbs add a touch of cheerful color to a room and give the gardener in all of us the satisfaction of a job well done and a little hope and warmth for the holidays.

BRIAN HALLETT is an art teacher at South Jefferson Central School in Adams. His family owns Halletts’ Florist and Greenhouse in Adams, which has been in business for more than three decades.

Murder in the Adirondacks — Mysterious cold case remains

orrando

A posthumous portrait of Orrando P. Dexter by Charles Ayer Whipple, courtesy New-York Historical Society Museum & Library.

The murder took place in the fall. The principal figures were an outsider and a local citizen. Relatives of the victim appealed for justice and posted a reward. The impartiality of police and judicial authorities was questioned. What little evidence could be found was circumstantial. The case became a media sensation. It remains unsolved.

Sound like the Oral “Nick” Hillary case, recently concluded with a “not guilty” judgment in St. Lawrence County? That’s only the latest inconclusive murder mystery in the north country. The incident I’ve described occurred in 1903 near St. Regis Falls, and today, 113 years later, no one knows who did the deed. Or no one is saying.

September 19 of that year dawned cold, gray and still across the northern Adirondacks. Just before noon, Orrando Perry Dexter left his 16-room mansion on the shore of what had been East Branch Pond until he renamed it Dexter Lake in honor of himself, hitched one of his fine horses to one of his fleet of carriages, and departed up the lane that would take him off his 7,000-acre estate and onto Blue Mountain Road. He was going, depending upon which rumor one chooses to believe, to the train station at Santa Clara to pick up some freight, or to the post office there, or to distant Nicholville to finalize a land transaction that would have put a local timber dealer out of business.

Whatever his designs, Dexter never made it. Before he reached the end of his private road, someone stepped out from behind a stack of cedar posts and shot him through the back. Orrando Dexter, age 48, Ivy Leaguer, lawyer and millionaire, tumbled from his carriage and lay dead in the dust.

Henry Dexter, Orrando’s father and the wealthy founder of the American News Company syndicate in New York City, promptly hired the best, determined to get to the bottom of his only child’s assassination: Pinkerton detectives scoured the area and cross-examined everyone they could corral. But solid evidence was scarce. The assailant left no tracks; the bullet was from the kind of gun everyone owned; everybody had a firm alibi. No indictment could be made.

The way some people saw it, no indictment would be made. “We all knew who killed Dexter and why, but never dared print it,” said a star reporter for William Randolph Hearst’s New York American newspaper. He claimed they were discouraged by the local district attorney, who allegedly told them “It was a popular murder, and we folks have got to live around here the rest of our lives.”

What made it “popular”? For one thing, Dexter had snapped up a lot of land that people around St. Regis Falls and Santa Clara had been used to logging, hunting and fishing, and peppered it with “No Trespassing” signs. He had boasted to local residents of his wealth and social superiority over them. He had ruined loggers by buying all the acreage surrounding theirs, isolating them on islands in a sea of his own holdings. He had posted waterways traditionally used for boating and log driving, an issue that remains contentious to this day in the Adirondacks. He’d even blown up one lumberman’s dam, asserting that it had caused the flooding of some of his property. Rumors circulated that he had forcibly impregnated one of his young servant girls, the daughter of a well-known local leader. In an era when “robber barons” from the big cities were accumulating huge tracts of land for their private enjoyment, revenge was in the air.

The media, which in 1903 meant newspapers, feasted on the social implications of the incident, reflecting the intensity of hard feelings between struggling natives and rich, imperious outsiders. One major New York City daily blared, “An Entire County, Police, People, Living in Terror, Says Millionaire Henry Dexter. Uncaught Slayer Roams Holding All in Fear – In Spite of the Fact That the Murderer of Orrando Dexter Is Known, He Goes at Liberty Up the State.” And that was just the headline.

The local press didn’t let such insults pass unnoticed, engaging the downstate giants in a war of words that at times threatened to gain more attention than the case itself. The St. Regis Falls Adirondack News (yes, like most small towns, St. Regis Falls had a newspaper back then) proclaimed that the copy urban correspondents had “concocted to make good reading for gullible city subscribers” was “a conglomeration of fabrications, mere rot.” The Malone Farmer — one of at least three newspapers in that county seat in those days — pontificated, “That there is ill feeling against rich men in the Adirondacks is ridiculous. There are many who think the [Adirondack] Park law is unjust, but landowners are safe.”

Evidently they were not safe, but in some circles suspicions — or was it relief? — grew that perhaps those who eliminated them were. Soon after the killing, the Franklin County sheriff reported through the press that he was “morally sure of his man.” A week later, the papers announced that an arrest was imminent. The next week, they carried brief notices about the affair, and that was the last they said about it. As Henry Dexter raged over his son’s “un-American” death and advertised a $5,000 reward for any scrap of information, the investigation withered like the leaves on that fall’s trees. The elder Dexter died unrequited in 1910, bequeathing $1.4 million to the conclusion of the case.

That never happened. Occasionally it has been resurrected, as someone has come forward with a far-fetched claim or the Dexter estate’s reward money has been publicized. But as an anonymous local resident told a national magazine writer in 1934, “It’ll take more Dexter money than there is to make anyone hereabouts tell what he knows.” Perhaps that sentiment applies to other unsolved North Country murders as well.

For more on Orrando Dexter’s murder, see “Who Killed Orrando P. Dexter?” Adirondack Life, May/June 1982, and Adirondack Outlaws: Bad Boys and Lawless Ladies, by Niki Kourofsky, Farcountry Press, 2015.

NEAL BURDICK lives in Canton. Retired as senior writer/editor at St. Lawrence University, he continues to teach a writing course there, and is a freelance writer, editor and anthologist with a special interest in his native north country. His column appears in every issue of NNY Living.

A few tips to stay in the holiday spirit this season

Michelle Graham

Michelle Graham

Alas, the holiday season is upon us, the most wonderful time of the year. Or is it? If you listen to television ads isn’t that what they claim? For some it’s a time of great stress and worry and it’s not the most wonderful time of year. But have no fear as a little connection to your mind, body and spirit may just help you survive the chaos of the season. It’s is a time to spread joy to others and bring joy and inner peace to yourself, as well.


Start the season off by being kind to yourself. Plan to have fun and a lot of it. Get together with friends and actually make time to celebrate the season and maybe even find time for a holiday drink, playing board games or just getting together for a wonderful holiday lunch and visit. A little holiday visit with good friends can truly make the holiday season that much more special.

Exercise and watch your waist line. Not only will exercise help keep the holiday pounds off, but it can actually help decrease stress. Eating well can also take you into January with no weight gain. Remember the average person gains 5 to 7 pounds through holiday season. Be mindful through the season and your body will be so grateful.

Start purchasing holiday gifts early. Better yet, make some of your gifts. You can find many great ideas on Pinterest. We all know the best gifts are homemade and come from the heart.

Take a time out. Practice peace of mind. Perhaps morning meditation or yoga can set your path for a peaceful day. Better yet, take some time to be lazy and read a good book or just find a moment of quiet.

Get organized in work and play. Don’t wait until the last minute to make a deadline or to check off all your holiday “to-do lists” done. Planning is a significant key to success; don’t wait until tomorrow to get things done today.

Bring joy to others. Visit an old friend or relative. Really visit, be present and put your phone or tablet away. Sometimes we are so connected to everyone else that we lose sight of what is right in front of us. Talk, visit and simply live in the moment.

Volunteer your time and talents. Where can you spread joy this holiday season? Wrap presents at the mall, shop for a shut-in or spend some time helping out at Watertown Urban Mission or other community organizations that need help. Volunteering is wonderful and truly makes you and others feel amazing.

Make a donation small or large to a worthy organization. Every little bit helps. Never underestimate the value of your monetary gift. Surprise the person behind you at the drive-through and pay for their order. Don’t walk by a Salvation Army Kettle without a little donation. My favorite is to give a gift card to a friend or co-worker without signing your name.

Be patient with others. Our lives are busy and rushed and we are not always as patient as we should be. Patience truly is a virtue. Stop rushing and enjoy these beautiful holiday moments. Relax and you will get through the line in a store or get to your destination. Smile along the way as it makes everyone feel better.

Practice the simple act of kindness in this crazy, ruthless world in all that you do. Everyone wants to react; take time to pause and just be kind. Just laugh when life throws you a curve ball. We truly need to laugh at life a little longer a little harder. Don’t be so serious. Relax and enjoy every single holiday moment and besides practicing kindness never hurt anyone. Don’t let the holiday season stress you out. Practice kindness in all things for yourself and others. Your mind, body and spirit will certainly thank you.

I wish you and your families a very happy holiday season and the healthiest of years ahead in 2017. Seize the opportunity to start anew and make it your best year yet.

5 Things Friday- December 2

Holiday Illuminations

1. Annual Christmas Tree Lighting

When: 6:30 to 10 p.m. Friday
Where: Public Square, Downtown Watertown
What: 6:30 p.m. – Musical Performance by General Brown 6th grade Chorus, Directed By Lindsey Davis K-6 Vocal Music Teacher; 6:45 p.m. – Announcement of Downtown Decorating Contest Winners; 6:45 p.m. – Musical Performance by the Northern Blend Chorus, Directed by Mary Ann Wert and Katie Taylor; 7:00 p.m. – Christmas Parade organized by Stanley Zaremba and sponsored by Benefit Services Group; 7:45 p.m. – Tree Lighting Ceremony and Count Down; 7:45 p.m. – 8:45 p.m. Visit with Santa at the Gazebo in Public Square Park. Sponsored by the Downtown Business Association; 7:45 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. – Music and Light Display every 30 minutes featuring thousands of LED lights that are synchronized to a variety of music. Hot chocolate, coffee and mulled cider provided free of charge courtesy of the Downtown Business Association.
Cost: Free
Info: publicsquare.com/tree.html

Friday / Watertown

2. 54th Annual Clayton Christmas Parade and Fireworks

When: 6 p.m. Saturday
Where: Downtown Clayton
What: Enjoy a “A Patriotic Christmas” themed parade of floats lit with lights. Following the parade, a fireworks display will take place over the St. Lawrence River.
Cost: Free
INFO
: 1000islands-clayton.com

Saturday / Clayton

3. Parish Christmas Tree Lighting

When: 2 to 4:30 p.m. Saturday
Where: Veteran’s Park
What: Tree lighting ceremony and celebration. Crafts, children’s games, stories, Santa and more.
Cost: Free
INFO: Kathy Allardice, 278-6632

Saturday / Parish

4. Light Up Pulaski

When: 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday
Where: Pulaski Historical Society, 3428 Maple Ave.
What: Mr. and Mrs. Clause will attend. Music, reading of “The Night Before Christmas,” punch and cookies.
Cost: Free
INFO: 268-4650

Sunday / Pulaski

5. Christmas Caroling and Christmas Tree Lighting

When: 4:15 to 7 p.m. Sunday
Where: Whitton Place, 7320 E. Main St.
What: Christmas Caroling and Christmas Tree Lighting. Christmas caroling at 4:15 p.m.; High Falls Apartments, 4061 Cherry St., 5 p.m.; caroling under the village Christmas tree, 5:30 p.m.; lighting of the tree, 5:45 p.m.; Santa arrives, 6 p.m. Refreshments, visits with Santa at St. John’s Church, 5838 McAlpine St.
Cost: Free
INFO: N/A

Sunday / Lyons Falls

Celebrate the Holidays

1. 8th annual Christmas Masquerade Ball

When: 5 p.m. Friday
Where: Bonnie Castle Resort, 31 Holland St.
What: The community is invited to the festive celebration and fundraiser that features live music by Fred & the Ed’s, a cash bar, hors d’oeuvres and silent and live auction items from local businesses. A photo booth will be provided by Bova Photography to capture the evening. Formal wear is required and masquerade masks for $5 are available at the door.
Cost: $40 at door
INFO: TIYLO.org

Fridfay / Alexandria Bay

2. North Country Festival of Trees

When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday through Sunday
Where: Dulles State Office Building, 317 Washington St.
What: Public viewing of decorated Christmas trees, voting and silent auction. Festivalof Trees Holiday Gala Friday at 6 p.m.
Cost: Viewing, free; Gala, $75 each
INFO: samaritanhealth.com/festivaloftrees

Friday through Sunday / Watertown

3. 2016 Holiday Reception

When: 5 to 7 p.m. Friday
Where: Jefferson County Historical Society, 228 Washington St.
What: Christmas music, Victorian decorations, hors de’oeuvres.
Cost: $5
INFO: 782-3491

Friday / Watertown

4. Christmas in Clayton

When: All Day Saturday
Where: Clayton
What: Christmas cookie sale: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., Christ Episcopal Church; Kris Kringle Holiday Market: Thousand Islands Winery; Tiny Tim’s Emporium: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Hawn Memorial Library; Horse and carriage rides: 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., Hawn Memorial Library; St. Lawrence Pottery Holiday Show: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Thousand Islands Museum Juried Craft Show: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Knights of Columbus; Wares and Wears exhibition and marketplace: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., Thousand Islands Arts Center; Holiday food fair: 11 a.m. to 2 p.m., St. Mary’s Church; Chicken barbecue: 2 p.m., O’Brien’s parking lot; Santa Central: 3 to 5 p.m., Clayton Opera House; Snapshots photo booth: 4 p.m., O’Brien’s.
Cost: Free
INFO: info@1000islands-clayton.com

Saturday / Clayton

5. Village-wide caroling

When: 2 to 4 p.m. Sunday
Where: Starting from Hammond Presbyterian Church, 217 County Road 134.
What
:  Sing holiday songs throughout the community.
Cost: Free
INFO: Lisa Gallagher, 244-4416, or Rev. Evon, 342-5662

Sunday / Hammond  

Something to Eat

1. Holiday Bazaar and Bake Sale

When: 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. Friday
Where: Carthage Area Hospital, new entrance off Hospital Drive.
What: Hosted by the CAH Auxiliary.
Cost: Free
INFO: 493-1000

Friday / Carthage

2. Sixth Annual Breakfast with Santa

When: 9 to 11 a.m. Saturday
Where: Hammond Presbyterian Church, 217 County Road 134.
What: Menu: French toast, scrambled eggs, sausage, fruit, and beverage. Face painting, gift bags, and photos.
Cost: $5
INFO: Lisa Gallagher, 244-4416, or Rev. Evon, 342-5662

Saturday / Hammond

3. Spaghetti dinner

When: 5 to 6:30 p.m. Saturday
Where: First Church of the Nazarene, 960 State St.
What: Menu: spaghetti, meatballs, sausage, salad, bread, drinks, dessert. Eat-in or take-out.
Cost: Meals for adults, $10; children’s meals, ages 5-15, $5; children ages 4 and younger eat free. Proceeds benefit Haiti mission trip.
INFO: 778-6707

Saturday / Carthage

4. Chicken barbecue

When: 11:30 a.m. Sunday
Where: Copenhagen Fire Department, 9950 Route 12.
What: Eat in or take out. Benefits Cubs Drill Team.
Cost: Dinners, $9.50; senior citizens, $7.50; children 11 years old and younger, $5.50; halves only, $5.
INFO: 688-4103

Sunday / Copenhagen

5. Fish fry

When: 4 p.m. Friday
Where: John C. Londraville American Legion Post 832, 248 E. Broadway St.
What: Menu: fried or boiled haddock, clam strips or chicken tenders, with coleslaw, French fries or baby browns, bread and butter. Benefits veterans’ and/or community projects and scholarships.
Cost: $10; seafood platter, $14.
INFO: re-order: 654-2101

Friday / Cape Vincent

The Arts

1. Gifts from the Gallery

When: 6 to 9 p.m. Friday
Where: Arts on the Square, Franklin Building, 52 Public Square.
What: Hosted by North Country Arts Council. Shopping, hot chocolate entertainment by Gino Cappuccetti.
Cost: Free
INFO: nnyart.org.

Friday / Watertown

2. Build your Own Snowman Clay Class for Kids

When: 6 p.m. Friday
Where: Lyme Free Library, 12165 Route 12E
What: With artist/instructor Tracey Jean.
Cost:  $10
INFO: 649-5454

Friday / Chaumont

3. Shoulder Season

When: Friday through Sunday
Where: Thousand Islands Arts Center, 314 John St.
What: Exhibit of cashmere paisley shawls.
Cost: Free
INFO: 686-4123

Friday through Sunday / Clayton

4. Musical Cinderella

When: 2 p.m. Friday and Saturday
Where: South Lewis Middle School
What: South Lewis Middle School musical, “Cinderella.” chicken and biscuit prior to Friday’s performance, cafeteria, 5-7 p.m., sponsored by South Lewis varsity baseball team.
Cost: $6 adults; $5 seniors and students. Discount passes available.
INFO: 348-2500

Friday and Saturday / Turin

5. 6th annual elf workshop

When: 10 a.m. Saturday
Where: Flower Memorial Library, 229 Washington St.
What: All materials supplied. Families welcome. Children leave with two wrapped gifts. Santa and Mrs. Claus to visit following workshop.
Cost: Free
INFO: 785-7709

Saturday / Watertown

Learning Something New

1. Diabetes education class

When: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Friday
Where: Carthage Area Hospital, 1001 West St.
What: Learn about diabetes and how to maintain health.
Cost: Free
INFO: 493-1000, ext. 3222

Saturday / Carthage

2. Children's Fall Craft Classes

When: 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday
Where: The Gallery Lake Saint Lawrence Arts, 10 Main St.
What: Classes held every other Saturday afternoon. Materials are provided. No reservations required, just bring your kids.
Cost: $5
INFO: N/A

Saturday / Waddington

3. No Worries

When: 2 to 4 p.m. Saturday
Where: Unitarian Universalist Church, 3 1/2 E. Main St.
What: Local Living Venture, tools for reducing stress with Kathy Montan. Dress in comfortable, loose fitting clothing, bring drinking water.
Cost: $22; couple/family of two, $40; students, $10.
INFO: ocallivingventure.org or 347-4223

Saturday / Canton

4. Tutoring and computer instruction

When: 10 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday
Where: Hawn Memorial Library, 220 John St.
What: Have your questions answered and learn new computer techniques.
Cost: Free
Info: N/A

Saturday / Clayton

5. Childbirth education classes

When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday
Where: Carthage Area Hospital conference room, 1001 West St.
What: Childbirth education class
Cost: Free
INFO: 493-1000

Saturday / Carthage

’Tis the season to start your holiday shopping

JUSTIN SORENSEN n WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES Connie Crowder, owner of DownEast’r Studio Designs shows her stemware coasters and cloth bowls to Nancy Kall , left, and Marcia Kall, Sunday during the Watertown Urban Mission Holiday Craft Fair and Market at the Dulles State Office Building.

JUSTIN SORENSEN / WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES
Connie Crowder, owner of DownEast’r Studio Designs shows her stemware coasters and cloth bowls to Nancy Kall , left, and Marcia Kall, Sunday during the Watertown Urban Mission Holiday Craft Fair and Market at the Dulles State Office Building.

[Read more…]

Have a plan, take a breath and don’t overdo it this season

untitled-1

It starts with Halloween. After that, the race is on for two solid months. Along with all our other chores and obligations there’s decorating (inside, outside and sometimes for more than one household), shopping, wrapping, cooking, baking, traveling, hosting and general celebrating, sometimes well into early January.

Throw in sibling squabbles, unmet expectations, missing or seriously ill loved ones and a little too much alcohol and you have the makings of a stressful, exhausting, potentially depressing time of year. What can you do about it? We asked several experts for their advice. Here’s what they had to say about how to handle some of the most common holiday stressors.

Shopping and gift-giving

Gift shopping can be stressful for all sorts of reasons. Among them is trying to find the perfect gift for everyone on your list. Elaine Rodino, a Pennsylvania psychologist, said you know it’s a problem if you’re taking too much time to choose each gift. “You feel like the gift, and often the wrapping, is a major reflection on you.”

Leslie Connor, a psychologist in Delaware, agrees. “By trying to find the ultimate gift we put unnecessary pressure on ourselves, which can be overwhelming.” That can lead to overspending, especially if your gift list is long. Instead, focus on simply getting something the recipient will enjoy and not what the gift says about you personally.

If you didn’t begin your holiday shopping in July, it’s time to get busy or you’ll be stuck at the mall with all the other procrastinators. Be prepared to be patient. Plan to arrive early, when stores and businesses open, or shop during the dinner hour, when crowds often thin out. Better yet, shop online but allow plenty of time for possible shipping delays.

Too many tasks on the to-do list

Make a list of everything you would like to do, delegate what you can and take on only those things you can comfortably accomplish. Then cross off the rest. “Ask yourself: ‘What do I find meaningful and what can I let go of?’” Connor said.

Here’s another way to think of it: “Accept that you can’t do all the work yourself,” said New York psychologist Carol Goldberg. She advises you to ask for and accept all offers of help. “You don’t have to show off your cooking and decorating skills. Give everyone a job.” And be realistic about your budget, time and energy. Here are some areas where you might cut back:

Decorating: Limit yourself to one area that’s most important to you or your family, say the front yard or the living room, and skip the rest. Or, scale back. “Be satisfied to be the house that’s next door to the one that makes the news every year,” advises Rodino. “Don’t even try to compete.”

n Gift-wrapping: Use gift bags, tissue paper and premade bows. Take advantage of charitable gift-wrapping fundraisers.

n Sending holiday cards: Just stop. Send holiday greetings via email or social media, advises Dr. Nick Dewan, a BayCare psychiatrist and medical director of Behavioral Health Services. Whittle down your list to only those you know will truly miss them. And, if the deadline is a problem, it’s OK to send New Year’s cards, Dewan adds.

n Baking: Take shortcuts. Start with a mix or use refrigerator dough. Buy plain bakery cookies, cakes or confections and decorate them yourself. Make just one favorite recipe rather than 10.

Cooking: Buy as much as you can afford from a deli, restaurant or caterer. Have guests bring dishes or help with the cooking. And, remember this sage advice from the queen of entertaining, the Barefoot Contessa, Ina Garten: “People don’t have a better time because you made everything yourself.”

n Cleaning: If possible, this is the time to hire a cleaning service or your neighbor’s housekeeper. Not in your budget? Streamline cleaning to the most used areas: living room, bathroom, kitchen. When invited guests ask how they can help, ask a few to plan to stay late to assist with cleanup. Use real flatware, but disposable plates, cups and napkins.

n Hosting dinners, parties: If you’re tired of hosting, come clean and ask someone else to do it. Or, you provide the location and ask others to bring the food, drinks and handle cleanup. Try inviting people over for dessert and coffee from 2 to 4 p.m. Make or buy one special dessert, and let guests who offer bring additional treats.

Expectations

Be realistic about what you can accomplish and afford. Don’t try to do everything yourself. Simplify the menu, drop dishes that are too much work, make it potluck and let everyone contribute. Dewan said we should all remember, “Most people care more about having fun and being together than having an elaborate celebration with a tired host.”

“Don’t compete with yourself,” adds Rodino. “Don’t feel that you have to outdo what you did last year. It just gets to be so much work that it’s less and less fun.”

Take stock of your family traditions and let go of the ones you no longer enjoy. Rodino said keeping holiday traditions alive and following them to a tee is a top reason for holiday stress. If attending midnight church services followed by a gift exchange is just too much for your family, find another service to attend and schedule gift-giving earlier in the day.

“All those traditions had a start somewhere, at sometime,” Rodino said. “So why not start some new ones that fit your schedule and your lifestyle better?”

And, while you’re managing expectations, don’t expect problem family members and friends to suddenly change and be the perfect guests this year. Connor said you should instead resolve not to react to or get drawn into their bad behavior. Dewan suggests you even practice in advance “positive ways to respond when they get under your skin.”

When your guests don’t get along

Be sure each knows the other one will be there or has been invited. Ask them to put aside their differences for the few hours that the family will be together.

“One thing that tends to upset people is that they imagine everyone else is with a loving, perfect family and they compare their imperfect family to that one,” Connor said. “The truth is that many people have family struggles. … Maybe you don’t stay as long as you would like, or you engage only with family members who are easier to be with.”

Problem drinkers

Stopping alcohol cold turkey can cause serious medical problems in alcoholics — do this only with medical help or supervision. Ask heavy drinkers to come over, say hello and leave before they start drinking. Don’t serve alcohol while they are there.

Dewan said it is important to set boundaries with them in advance and let them know how you expect them to behave. “Don’t bring up past bad behavior and hurts, but do stand firm on your boundaries for this year,” he said.

For those who have quit drinking, it can be hard to be around alcohol, especially in the early stages of recovery. Have plenty of nonalcoholic beverages available. Limit the amount and kind of alcohol you serve: no hard liquor or fruity cocktails that make it too easy to overindulge. Have just a couple of bottles of wine on hand, not a couple of cases.

Don’t ever push alcoholic drinks on guests and don’t let drinkers drive. Cut off alcohol at least an hour before the party ends. Have phone numbers handy for taxicab and ride-share services. Or, if you’d rather not serve alcohol in support of someone who is newly sober or struggling with alcohol, let your guests know in advance and ask them not to BYOB.

Missing a loved one

It’s OK to remember and talk about loved ones who have passed away or who can’t be at the party because of illness or inability to travel. Honor that person with activities like inviting guests to help make a memory album, or visiting a grave site or volunteering at their favorite charity. “Find a way to express your grief or sadness, rather than holding it in,” Connor said.

If a loved one is hospitalized or too ill to attend, Goldberg suggests passing around a card, having everyone sign it and adding a personal message. Or, make a video for those who would enjoy that more. It lets those who couldn’t attend know they were missed and remembered.

YMCA opens facility in Sackets Harbor

ymca_blu_rgb_r

 

By MARCUS WOLF
MWOLF@WDT.NET

The Watertown Family YMCA will use the former Madison Barracks Health Club owned by Lawler Realty LLC to open a satellite facility early next year.

Steve N. Rowell, executive director of health and wellness at the Y, said the facility, at 119 Pike Road, will offer programs similar to the Watertown and Carthage facilities and potentially create new programs to meet local demand. The Y and Lawler Realty reached an agreement in October that will require the Y to pay only utility bills, taxes and interest.

“It’s one of the best things to happen to Sackets in a long time,” Mayor Vincent J. Battista said.

The Y will incorporate a full fitness center with family wellness programming and multiple youth and senior activity programs at the former health club.

Mr. Rowell said the Y will offer its preventive care program for senior citizens and its after-school child care program, which it offers at Sackets Harbor Central School, at the new facility. The Y also considered using its access to Lake Ontario to create watersport activities to accompany its youth sports programs. Members will have access to the facility’s gymnasium, weight room, locker rooms and cardio equipment. The Y has not determined its hours of operation.

“We will also offer a group exercise room with many different exercise classes,” Mr. Rowell said. “It would really just be an extension of our services out of the Watertown YMCA.”

To preserve the facility and accommodate his new tenant, Michael A. Lawler, owner of Lawler Realty, completed multiple interior and exterior renovations for the facility.

Mr. Lawler said his contractors have built a new roof, replaced the doors, repaired and painted the walls, repaved the road and installed new windows, lights, carpet and ceramic tile flooring since last summer. Lawler Realty received a $500,000 grant loan commitment from the Development Authority of the North Country to help finance the $600,000 project in July. Mr. Lawler said he expects the contractors and construction workers will finish most of the renovations by Jan. 1 if he receives funding from the grant loan commitment next week, with only some additional masonry work in the spring and brick work in the summer.

“It’s functioning right along,” Mr. Lawler said.

Lawler Realty purchased the former health club in 2010 from Madison Barracks Associates, which operated the facility from 1993 to 2005. Mr. Battista said the club closed about nine years ago.

“I hope that we as a community can help support” it, he said, “and make it an important part of our community.”

5 Things Friday- November 18

Celebrate the Holidays

1. Home for the Holidays Festival

When: 10 a.m. to 9 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday
Where: Lewis County Historical Society, 7552 S. State St.
What: Train display, silent auction, Christmas trees and wreaths, gingerbread houses on display. 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, Nov. 25; Adirondack Community Chorus concert, 7:30 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 26.
Cost: Free
Info: 376-8957

Friday to Sunday / Lowville

2. Baby It’s Cold Outside

When: 5 to 9 p.m. Friday
Where: Bonnie Castle Resort, 31 Holland St.
What: Part of Bonnie Castle “Pay it Forward” campaign, tastings and crafts.
Cost: Donation of a new or gently used winter outerwear item, given to local schools and churches for locals in need.
INFO
: Mariann, 482-4511, ext. 502, or Mariann@bonniecastle.com

Friday / Alexandria Bay

3. Light up the Night Parade

When: 6:30 p.m. Saturday
Where: State St.
What: The parade begins at OFA school and follows State Street to the Dobisky Center at 100 Riverside Avenue. Floats will be lit up with lights and song. Children can visit with Santa after the parade.
Cost: Free
INFO: 393-3540

Saturday / Ogdensburg

4. Holiday Shopper’s Poker Run

When: 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday
Where: Participating businesses in Alexandria Bay, Clayton and Cape Vincent.
What: Collect cards from local businesses as you shop for the holidays. Cards handed in, 5 p.m., O’Brien’s, 226 Webb St. Receive cards Friday, Nov. 18 as well. Auctions, prizes, food, benefits local food pantries.
Cost: Free
INFO: Clayton Chamber of Commerce, 686-3771

Saturday / Clayton, Alexandria Bay, Cape Vincent

5. 22nd Annual Festival of Trees

When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday to Sunday
Where: Thousand Islands Museum, 312 James St.
What: Local businesses, organizations and families bring in and decorate trees or other holiday displays.  Admission is free, but we ask that you bring in a non-perishable item for out “Fill the Boat” campaign which fills our St. Lawrence skiff with food for the local food pantry. Vote for your favorite display.
Cost: Free
INFO: 686-5794

Friday to Sunday / Clayton

 

Helping Others

1. Cancer Benefit for Kathy Ives

When: 5 p.m. Friday
Where: American Legion Post 586, 10 S. Main St.
What: 50/50 raffles, Chinese auctions. Proceeds to help family with medical bills and expenses.
Cost: Donation based
INFO: 232-2715

Friday / Adams

2. Third Annual Urban Mission Holiday Giveback

When: 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday
Where: Ramada Inn, 6300 Arsenal St.
What: Pictures with Santa, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Bring non-perishable food item or unwrapped toy for Urban Mission.
Cost: $10
INFO: helpinghandsmic@gmail.com or 529-4893

Saturday / Watertown

3. Bowl-A-Thon

When: 12:30 p.m. Saturday
Where: Pla-Mor Lanes, 577 State St.
What: To benefit Jefferson County SPCA. Lunch provided during luncheon at 2:30 p.m. Prices and trophies.
Cost: $16; per couple, $30.
INFO: 782-3260

Saturday / Watertown

4. Turkey Dinner and Basket Drawing

When: 5 p.m. Saturday
Where: John C. Londraville American Legion Post 832, 248 E. Broadway St.
What: Benefits legion auxiliary.
Cost: Free
INFO: 654-2101

Saturday / Cape Vincent

5. Memory Wreath

When: All day
What:  To benefit Lacona Clock Tower maintenance, with Coterie Club, names and payment of donation accepted through Saturday, Nov. 26. Names read night of wreath lighting: 6 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 27. Music and refreshments.
Cost: N/A
INFO/PAYMENTS: Eleanor Slater, Coterie Club Treasurer, P.O. Box 201, Sandy Creek, NY 13145. Checks payable to Coterie Club.

Saturday / Lacona

  

Fun with Learning

1. Pencil Drawing

When: 6 p.m. Friday
Where: Lyme Free Library, 12165 Route 12E
What: Learn the fundamentals of sketching and basic drawing techniques. For ages 11 and older.
Cost: $35
INFO: 786-2385 to register.

Friday / Chaumont

2. Snowmobile Safety Class

When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday
Where: Copley Foundation House, 12030 Route 12E.
What: With Gary Kocher, New York Parks and Recreation instructor. Must be 10 or older.
Cost: N/A
INFO: 486-5230 or cwasr@twc.com

Saturday / Chaumont

3. The Global Water Crisis, Abroad and at Home

When: 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. Sunday
Where: Sisters of St. Joseph Motherhouse, 1425 Washington St.
What: Presentation with Dr. Adrienne Rygel, associate professor and department chair of civil and environmental engineering technology, SUNY Canton. Light refreshments served.
INFO: Free

Sunday / Watertown

4. Share Your French Heritage! Stories from Quebec

When: 1 p.m. Saturday
Where: Adirondack Museum, Blue Mountain Lake
What: TAUNY has received funding to work with other partners in the region to research the historical connection between Northern New York and Quebec and to investigate the ongoing cultural influence of that connection. Participants are encouraged to bring your own photos of family members and homesteads, objects that represent family traditions, and other artifacts and heirlooms that tell the story of your French heritage. In addition to hearing your stories, we’d love to hear your ideas for future programs and projects that present this heritage to a wide audience. The program will be led by TAUNY’s Executive Director, Jill Breit.
Cost: Free
INFO: adkmuseum.org.

Saturday / Blue Mountain Lake

5. Children’s Fall Craft Classes

When: 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday
Where: The Gallery Lake Saint Lawrence Arts, 10 Main St.
What: Classes held every other Saturday afternoon. Materials are provided. No reservations required, just bring your kids.
Cost: $35
INFO: N/A

Saturday / Waddington

 

Something to Eat

1. Chicken and Biscuit Dinner

When: 4:30 to 7 p.m. Saturday
Where: First Congregational Church of Lisbon, 9226 County Route 28
What: Menu: chicken and biscuits, mashed potatoes and gravy, peas and carrots, coleslaw, pickles and cranberries, apple crisp, beverage. Benefits Camp Laurent Maintenance Fund
Cost: $9; children 10 and younger, $5.
INFO: 393-7780

Saturday / Lisbon

2. Haddock Dinner

When: 4 to 6 p.m. Saturday
Where: AMVETS Club, Whippleville Road
What: Open to the public.
Cost:  $9 per person
INFO: N/A

Sunday / Malone

3. Breakfast with Santa

When: 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Sunday
Where: Sandy Ogdensburg Elks Lodge, 322 Caroline St.
What/Menu: scrambled eggs, pancakes, bacon, sausage, home fries, juice and coffee. All are welcome. Enjoy breakfast with Santa.
Cost: $7 pp and kids under 5 years eat for free.
INFO: N/A

Sunday / Ogdensburg

4. Hunters Pancake Breakfast

When: 7 to 11:30 a.m. Saturday
Where: Adams Center Fire Hall, 13401 North St.
What: Enjoy a pancake breakfast to benefit the Ladies Auxiliary.
Cost: $7.50; children ages 12 and younger, $4.
INFO: 583-5533

Saturday / Adams Center

5. Comedy Dinner at Tavern 230

When: 4 p.m. to 8 p.m. Sunday
Where: Tavern230 at Snow Ridge, 4173 West Road.
What: 4 p.m., happy hour and seating; 5 p.m., Italian buffet dinner; 6 p.m., show begins. Comedians: Moody McCarthy and Nick Marra.
Cost: $35
INFO: snowridge.com or main office, 348-8456

Sunday / Turin

 

Family Fun

1. Lego fun day

When: 10:30 a.m. to Noon Saturday
Where: Annie Porter Ainsworth Memorial Library, 6064 S. Main St.
What: Legos provided by library. Listen to Lego story. New theme every month. For ages 4-12. Ages 7 and younger must be accompanied by an adult.
Cost: Free
INFO: 387-3732

Saturday / Sandy Creek

2. Maple Science Fair

When: 3 p.m. Saturday
Where: American Maple Museum, 9756 State Route 812, Croghan
What: Learn about the maple industry through science experiments, maple products, maple trees and more.
Cost: Free
INFO: 346-1107

Saturday / Croghan

3. Learning to Work with Clay

When: 9 a.m. to noon Saturday
Where: Norwood American Legion, 10 Maple St.
What: These classes will allow students to explore all aspects of creating with clay.  Hand building is the perfect way to get acquainted with this very flexible medium.  It is for all age and talent levels, and the projects that can be accomplished are infinite. All materials included.
Cost: $65 public; $58.50 members
INFO: tiartscenter.org

Saturday / Clayton

4. Family Movies and Crafts

When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday Where: Hawn Memorial Library, 220 John St.
What: Enjoy movies and making crafts with the whole family.
Cost: Free
Info: hawnmemoriallibrary.org

Saturday / Clayton

5. Double Play 2016 Swim Lessons

When: 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday
Where: Lowville Academy and Central School, 7668 N. State St.
What: Mommy and me class, any age. Pre-register at Double Play Fitness Center.
Cost: Ages 3+, $55.
INFO: doubleplaycc.com or 376-7001

Saturday / Lowville