Summer 2016 Cover Story: Healthy Eating

Plan & Prep For Healthy Eating

Julie Bailey makes grilled cheese sandwiches with her daughter, Eleanor, 8, in their Canton home. Mrs. Bailey began to change how her family eats in September, focusing on healthier choices. While seeking advice, she discovered the website 100daysofrealfood.com, which offers more realistic suggestions and tips. Now her family strives for a balance of 60 percent processed foods and at least 40 percent whole foods. “Before I started this effort it was probably 80/20,” she said. Photo by Jason Hunter, NNY Living.

Julie Bailey makes grilled cheese sandwiches with her daughter, Eleanor, 8, in their Canton home. Mrs. Bailey began to change how her family eats in September, focusing on healthier choices. While seeking advice, she discovered the website 100daysofrealfood.com, which offers more realistic suggestions and tips. Now her family strives for a balance of 60 percent processed foods and at least 40 percent whole foods. “Before I started this effort it was probably 80/20,” she said. Photo by Jason Hunter, NNY Living.

For many working mothers, finding the right tools to keep a family on the path to wellness is a key to lasting success

By Karee Magee, NNY Living

Most mothers would agree that motherhood is the most challenging job they’ll ever hold. Add the hectic schedules of working mothers to the responsibilities of raising children and it may seem inconceivable how some women manage everything, particularly the time and effort to put together a healthy diet for their children. [Read more…]

Winter 2016 Feature Story: CSA Farming

Invest in fresh with a CSA share

Joyce M. Kent weighs tomatoes while working at her son’s produce booth, Kent Family Growers, at the Canton Farmer’s Market. At left is her husband David J. Kent. The Lisbon farm offers year-round CSA shares. Photo by Jason Hunter, NNY Living.

Joyce M. Kent weighs tomatoes while working at her son’s produce booth, Kent Family Growers, at the Canton Farmer’s Market. At left is her husband David J. Kent. The Lisbon farm offers year-round CSA shares. Photo by Jason Hunter, NNY Living.

By Karee Magee, NNY Living

The grocery store has long been dominated by soldier-like rows of foods while the freshest and healthiest sections on the perimeter have grown ever smaller.

As those sections have decreased, the products, especially produce, become more expensive and less fresh.

“It’s an important public health issue,” said Gloria McAdam, executive director of GardenShare, a nonprofit that helps low-income families afford locally produced food. “The lower a family’s income the more likely they’ll buy the cheapest food they can instead of the healthiest.

Options might seem slim, but a growing number of Community Supported Agriculture farms are bringing local, fresh produce back to the north country.

“It will absolutely be fresher,” Ms. McAdam said. “The average eggs from the grocery store are 45 days old.”

If shoppers buy eggs from a CSA, though, they would last longer without having to be refrigerated if they haven’t traveled far, she said.

A CSA is a partnership between a farmer and local consumers where everyone shares the risks and benefits of farming, Ms. McAdam said.

Consumers pay up front at the beginning of the growing season, usually in June, and receive weekly deliveries or pickups of produce and other items.

Dan Kent, of Kent Family Growers, a CSA in Lisbon, said being a partner isn’t as risky as it seems.

“There is really no risk,” he said. “We produce more than enough.”
Ms. McAdam said that consumers usually end up with more produce than what the payment is worth.

Each CSA offers different items with the staples mainly produce, but farms also offer cheese, eggs, beef, chicken and niche products.

“We try to give people the largest portion of each share the staples, but we offer some special items like strawberries and cantaloupe to keep it interesting,” Mr. Kent said.

The produce available changes depending on the season though. Strawberries and blueberries are available in the late spring, but items like tomatoes, potatoes, peppers and squash are available later.

Certain CSA’s, including Kent Family Growers also have a winter season running from November to March.

Mr. Kent’s farm has a high tunnel similar to a greenhouse, but passively heated, to grow winter vegetables including beets, carrots, onions and cabbage. They also freeze fresh produce like broccoli and cauliflower for the winter season.

Mr. Kent’s family produces pickles, pesto and strawberry jam as niche items for the winter season. He said his customers appreciate the CSA because it “forces them to eat vegetables.”

“I might say we’re encouraging them,” Mr. Kent said. “People are afraid of throwing away local produce. You’re going to make the extra effort to put it to use.”

GardenShare offers a program to help low-income families in St. Lawrence County to afford the CSA payment called CSA Bonus Bucks. The program pays $100 of the cost of a CSA membership.

“Every farm is different,” McAdam said. “Find the farm that is right for you and then come back to us for CSA Bucks.”

GardenShare maintains a list of CSA’s and Farmers’ Markets in St. Lawrence County on its website gardenshare.org. To find CSA’s in the Lewis and Jefferson counties check the Cornell Cooperative Extensions website at cce.cornell.edu.

Karee Magee is a magazine associate for NNY Magazines. Contact her at 661-2381 or kmagee@wdt.net.

Five Things Friday – May 15

Happy Friday! Welcome to the end of the week. Celebrate NNY with events across the north country.

Performance

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Five Things Friday – April 3

Happy Friday and Happy Easter!

Easter

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Five Things Friday – March 6

Happy Friday!

[Just click each event for more info.]

Learning

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February Break fun and active learning camps held throughout week

WATERTOWN — The class bells weren’t ringing Monday morning, but kids kept learning and having fun at February break camps in Watertown and Clayton.

“Kids love science, and our lessons piggyback on what they’re learning in school,” said Antique Boat Museum educator Julie C. Broadbent.

There are activities for youths ages 4 to 18 around the area this week. The Antique Boat Museum is holding a February Break Science Camp for children ages 4 to 10. The Sci-Tech Center is open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. with different workshops for youths age 8 to 16, and the Cornell Cooperative Extension in Watertown will hold two educational workshops for youths age 6 to 18.

“People who want to brave the cold can come out and enjoy a day of learning and also get out of the house,” said Stephen A. Karon, executive director of the Sci-Tech Center of Northern New York.

The Sci-Tech Center, 154 Stone St., will be open all week from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and two workshops, “Morse Code and the Mystery of Cryptograms” and “Build Your Own Take-Home Crystal Radio,” will be held today and Thursday.

“Morse Code and the Mystery of Cryptograms” is for ages 8 through 16 and will be at 11:30 a.m. today. Students will learn the history of Morse code and how it is used to send messages by telegraph and radio. Enough letters will be learned to transmit and write several words. Participants also will learn how to decipher cryptoquote codes and how the binary number system works. The cost is $6 for nonmembers and $3 for members.

The “Build Your Own Take-Home Crystal Radio” workshop is for ages 11 through 15. The workshop will be at 11 a.m. Thursday. Each student will receive a crystal radio kit and build it during the class to take home. These “free energy” AM radios use no batteries or plugs. Radio theory, ham radio and other aspects of radio broadcast and reception also will be discussed. The workshop will last about 3½ hours and cost $21 for nonmembers and $18 for members.

“We open up to keep minds working during the break,” Mr. Karon said. “Here they’ll get to experience and learn about science.”

The Antique Boat Museum is hosting a science-themed camp through the week.

This two-hour craft, reading, and special-activity time will explore the science of boating. Each day the children will experiment and explore various topics, such as learning about local ecosystems, weather, underwater ecosystems and how to build simple machines.

Each session is $7 per child for members and $10 for nonmembers, with a maximum family charge of $21 per day. Ms. Broadbent said there is a flat-rate charge for families who wish to attend all four remaining sessions. Nonmembers would pay $40 and members pay $30. Children under 7 must have an adult stay with them.

Cornell Cooperative Extension Association of Jefferson County’s 4-H Youth Development Program will hold two special programs this week: Winter Break Special and 4-H Choose Health Teen Active Leader Training.

Today from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., youths age 6 to 18 will engage in hands-on experiential learning activities at the Extension office on 203 North Hamilton St., Watertown.

Participants will stretch, strengthen and balance their way through a 4-H Fitness Through Yoga station. Youths can also learn to sew through a fabric and textile demonstration and take home a completed project. In the afternoon participants will tube together at Dry Hill.

On Thursday and Friday from 9 a.m. to 4:30 p.m., a 4-H Choose Health Active Teen Leader Training will be offered at the Extension office for youths ages 14 to 19 at no cost.

 

 

By Katherine Clark Ross

Five Things Friday – Jan. 30

Happy weekend!

 

Bring stories to life

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Summer camp not far away

One of the area’s most popular summer camps, Camp Wabasso, has opened registration for Summer 2013 campers, with an early bird price incentive. [Read more…]