What You May Not Know About ‘Dogs at Cards’

[Read more…]

The U.S. Invasions of Canada

The Battle of the Windmill was a battle fought in November 1838 in the aftermath of the Upper Canada Rebellion.

[Read more…]

The House That Wouldn’t Be

WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES FILE PHOTO

[Read more…]

How the Dewey Decimal System Got Its Name

Melvil Dewey

[Read more…]

How ‘Vacationland’ Got Its Name

HISTORICAL ARCHIVE WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES NEWS CLIPPING

[Read more…]

It’s a Pirate’s Life For Me!

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY LIVING
Alex Mosher throws “pirate treasure” into the crowd during the pirate invasion for Bill Johnston’s Pirate Days in Alexandria Bay.

[Read more…]

Navigating The Rumor and Fable of Thousand Islands Dressing

[Read more…]

New York’s other ‘Central Park’

Park-goers enjoy the wading pool at Thompson Park, ca. 1910. The pool was reputed to only be 14 inches deep. Photo courtesy of Jefferson County Historical Society.

By the 1850s, many American cities were undergoing significant changes. Hundreds of thousands of people across the nation had left their homes in outlying rural areas and moved into urban centers looking to fill jobs created by the Industrial Revolution.

[Read more…]

City shined with patriotism: Watertown historically known as ‘Garland City’ during Golden Age

Watertown’s Public Square is decked out in garland and patriotic bunting for a firemen’s convention, ca. August 1910. The city is historically known as the “Garland City.” Photo courtesy of the Jefferson County Historical Society.

There are interesting and often amusing nicknames for cities all across the United States. From the well-known, such as “Sin City,” “The Big Apple” and “The Big Easy,” to the more obscure like “The Holy City” (Charleston, S.C.), “Charm City” (Baltimore, Md.) and even “The City That God Forgot” (Utica). Monikers speak to these cities’ current character or their history and Watertown is no exception.

[Read more…]

Swami’s retreat: India’s first spiritual, cultural leader to the West had ties to NNY

Swami Vivekanada was one of the first cultural ambassadors to the West, representing India and Hinduism in his teachings. Photo courtesy of Ramakrisha-Vivekanada Center of New York.

By Lenka Walldroff

“Brothers and Sisters of America!”

Thus began Swami Vivekananda’s speech to the Parliament of the World’s Religions on Sept. 11, 1893. As part of the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition, the Parliament of the World’s Religions met in Chicago to foster inter faith understanding and tolerance. Swami Vivekananda, then a still unknown monk-philosopher to the Western world, came to represent India and Hinduism.

[Read more…]