Ice Shanty’s Take the Trophy: Clayton fishing derby reels in fish and family fun

PHOTO PROVIDED BY Horizon Aerial Media Services

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Chasing the Flag: North Country ice fishermen do it for the love of the sport

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY LIVING
Christopher Hyde monitors his tipups while fishing on the St. Lawrence River in Cape Vincent.

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Out with the Old, In with The New: Embracing alternative traditions

BY: Sarah Compo
For many, a new year means “out with the old and in with the new.” The same goes for elements of a wedding ceremony or reception. While there are certain trends that will never go away, 2018 brings with it a host of fresh ideas for couples looking to put a new twist on old traditions.  Here is a look at some of the most popular wedding trends for 2018:

A new focus on the after party:

                For most couples, the bulk of wedding planning has traditionally focused on the reception. However, more and more people are investing time—and money—into the “after party.” The after party can be as simple as telling guests to meet at a nearby watering hole—with or without the open tab—or as elaborate as reserving a space at a conveniently located bar or restaurant, with décor, snacks, etc.

Marble and copper-the new “it” décor combo:

                In recent years, sparkles and rose gold have dominated wedding décor. This year, many couples are taking cues from one of the most popular pairings for the home—marble and copper. 

Ditching cake for donuts:

                Couples aren’t quite ready to fully do away with the traditional wedding cake, but many are choosing to have a smaller cake—for picture and cutting purposes—and then serving more unique desserts, like donuts, to guests.

Adding color with candles:

                In recent years, more and more couples have moved away from the traditional white or ivory candles and are opting for colored candles to add a splash of color. Colored candles—think pinks, blues or purples—are an easy, unexpected way to jazz up your décor without breaking the bank.

Doing away with doing it all yourself:

                For couples, one of the biggest stressors is finding loved ones who can take care of the little details and help their day run smoothly. Today, more couples are choosing to hire a “day-of-coordinator” who can help them on the day of with everything from setting up their reception space and running last minute errands to paying vendors and helping clean up.

Picture this-alternatives to the traditional photo booth:

                From unique backdrops to vintage camera booths, there are new and exciting options for those who are looking for something other than the classic wedding photo booth. Look no further than Pinterest for ideas on how you can make your own, or locate a professional who can provide services for you.

 

Homestead Wed in a Field of Family: An organically grown love story

Due West Photography

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Cookies Take the Cake: Annual amateur cookie competition a sweet treat

AMANDA MORRISON / NNY LIVING
Kelly E. Reinhardt hosts an annual cookie cook-off for the holidays at her Sackets Harbor home.

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Something Old is Something New: Vintage setups are all the rage at weddings for 2017

Photo by: Jovial Photography

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Winter 2016: Fashion

Fast fashion made greener

Above, an abundance of discount clothing retailers has led to increased low-cost options for consumers. Below, many retailers employ a practice called fast fashion, which started gaining popularity in the 1990s. It refers to the process of creating a garment and getting it into stores as quickly as possible. Textile recycling, or donating used clothes to thrift stores, has helped to eliminate thousands of pounds of clothing from the regional waste stream.

Above, an abundance of discount clothing retailers has led to increased low-cost options for consumers. Below, many retailers employ a practice called fast fashion, which started gaining popularity in the 1990s. It refers to the process of creating a garment and getting it into stores as quickly as possible. Textile recycling, or donating used clothes to thrift stores, has helped to eliminate thousands of pounds of clothing from the regional waste stream.

Textile recycling helps the north country manage an eco-friendly waste stream

By Katie Machia, NNY Living

Photos by AFM Photography

In 1990, the average American household spent approximately 5 percent of its overall budget on apparel. Today, that percentage has dropped to 3.5 percent, which amounts to an average of $1,700 a year, according to a recent article in Forbes magazine. [Read more…]

North Country students get internship experience through local BOCES

Local Boards of Cooperative Educational Services provide north country high school students with internship opportunities to prepare them for work and college. [Read more…]

North country women stitch up plan to help widows in Malawi

Ellen D. Grayson poses Friday with a treadle sewing machine and a school uniform from Malawi at her sister-in-law’s house in Madrid. Mrs. Grayson and Margot M. McGorman of Watertown will visit Malawi this June to teach widows how to sew school uniforms. Photo by Jason Hunter, Watertown Daily Times.

Ellen D. Grayson poses Friday with a treadle sewing machine and a school uniform from Malawi at her sister-in-law’s house in Madrid. Mrs. Grayson and Margot M. McGorman of Watertown will visit Malawi this June to teach widows how to sew school uniforms. Photo by Jason Hunter, Watertown Daily Times.

Two north country women are hoping that by sharing their sewing skills they can improve the lives of widows in a rural community in Malawi, a poverty-stricken country in Southeast Africa. [Read more…]

Potsdam native plans commercial kitchen to teach preparing and preserving local food

POTSDAM — This April, construction will begin on what three food enthusiasts hope will be a gateway to a healthier, more affordable diet for north country residents.

According to information he posted recently on Facebook, Potsdam native Will J. Trithart, now living in Binghamton, was recently approved by the Town Planning Board to create a 300-square-foot commercial kitchen inside a house he and his wife plan to build on an 18-acre parcel adjacent to St. Mary’s Cemetery on Route 56.

Mr. Trithart and his wife, Lourdes Lister, plan to build on land formerly used as pastureland for horses.

In his post, Mr. Trithart, a food entrepreneur and chef, said the kitchen, which will inhabit the first floor of the approximately 1,500-square-foot house, is to be “a space where food can be processed (frozen, canned, dried, cooked, packaged).” It will also host cooking classes he will teach on preparing and preserving local food.

Mr. Trithart’s wife, who will begin her studies toward a Master of Business Administration at Clarkson University this fall, will help with the accounting side of the operation, and to create a business plan.

Mr. Trithart, who operates by the idea that “the more you cook, the healthier you’re going to eat,” said he wants to teach people how to use cooking techniques like sautéing and slow roasting, and help educate them on how to access local food.

He argued that when people cook for themselves, they tend to choose more whole foods, and with a little education on how to access and use locally grown produce, residents can afford to eat healthier, and support area farmers.

“I think that food and how we grow it, and how we consume it, is integral to the health of our community,” he said. “The ways we consume food can either help or hurt us, and lots of people don’t have the means to access good food.”

Mr. Trithart said classes will be driven by demand, and he is open to incorporating dishes from other cultures, as well as ideas from the community, into them.

He said he is also looking into installing a solar array on the property, hoping to make the house and kitchen carbon neutral.

“We’re looking into our options. We haven’t decided on a system yet,” he said.

Mr. Trithart’s mother, Town Councilwoman Rosemaria Rivezzi, said she will partner with her son to create the kitchen, and help finance it.

She said the idea to create the kitchen, and to teach people about using local food, is something she has been mulling for a long time, and was an idea she had hoped to flesh out after retiring from teaching.

She said like her son, she wants to show people how better to prepare what she called “simple good food,” because they may not realize what is possible, not having received that kind of knowledge from family.

“I feel a strong sense of community in this area, and so for me this is a way to develop that even more, in terms of local food issues,” she said. “And I know Will has a passion for that as well.”

In his post, Mr. Trithart said he is looking forward to collaborating with local farmers and people who are passionate about food, and hopes to have the kitchen up and running in early 2017.

By Alan Rizzo, Watertown Daily Times