A Battle to the No. 1 Spot: Thousand Islands High School talent on the rise, with two players driving towards greatness

DAYTONA NILES / NNY GOLF
Matt Barton and Tyler Turgeon are two upcoming talents on the 2018 Thousand Island High School golf team.

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Holistic Health A Nontraditional Alternative

CHRISTOPHER LENNEY / NNY LIVING
Five Elements Living, Colton, New York.

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3D Imaging Enhances Confidence, Diagnostics

DAYTONA NILES / NNY LIVING
Dr. Daniel Gray exams a 3D mammogram at the Northern Radiology in Watertown.

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How ‘Vacationland’ Got Its Name

HISTORICAL ARCHIVE WATERTOWN DAILY TIMES NEWS CLIPPING

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Out with the Old, In with The New: Embracing alternative traditions

BY: Sarah Compo
For many, a new year means “out with the old and in with the new.” The same goes for elements of a wedding ceremony or reception. While there are certain trends that will never go away, 2018 brings with it a host of fresh ideas for couples looking to put a new twist on old traditions.  Here is a look at some of the most popular wedding trends for 2018:

A new focus on the after party:

                For most couples, the bulk of wedding planning has traditionally focused on the reception. However, more and more people are investing time—and money—into the “after party.” The after party can be as simple as telling guests to meet at a nearby watering hole—with or without the open tab—or as elaborate as reserving a space at a conveniently located bar or restaurant, with décor, snacks, etc.

Marble and copper-the new “it” décor combo:

                In recent years, sparkles and rose gold have dominated wedding décor. This year, many couples are taking cues from one of the most popular pairings for the home—marble and copper. 

Ditching cake for donuts:

                Couples aren’t quite ready to fully do away with the traditional wedding cake, but many are choosing to have a smaller cake—for picture and cutting purposes—and then serving more unique desserts, like donuts, to guests.

Adding color with candles:

                In recent years, more and more couples have moved away from the traditional white or ivory candles and are opting for colored candles to add a splash of color. Colored candles—think pinks, blues or purples—are an easy, unexpected way to jazz up your décor without breaking the bank.

Doing away with doing it all yourself:

                For couples, one of the biggest stressors is finding loved ones who can take care of the little details and help their day run smoothly. Today, more couples are choosing to hire a “day-of-coordinator” who can help them on the day of with everything from setting up their reception space and running last minute errands to paying vendors and helping clean up.

Picture this-alternatives to the traditional photo booth:

                From unique backdrops to vintage camera booths, there are new and exciting options for those who are looking for something other than the classic wedding photo booth. Look no further than Pinterest for ideas on how you can make your own, or locate a professional who can provide services for you.

 

You Swing Like a Girl: Women’s leagues tee off

JUSTIN SORENSEN / NNY GOLF Connie Natali and Alexandra Buduson, both of Clayton, stand above the green at the C-Way Golf Club.

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The Sweet Sounds of Music

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Connecting With Life Through NNY Rivers

JUSTIN SORENSEN / NNY LIVING
Ginger Anson and Reese Anson, 8, explore an area of the Black River in Glen Park where they’d often picnic, covered in water after rain and melting snow.

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‘Art of Winter’ inspiration found in forests to the kitchen

JUSTIN SORENSEN / NNY LIVING
Jessica Phinney, curator at the Thousands Islands Art Center stands in the Winter Art Exhibit Friday in Clayton. The exhibit runs February 3 through March 17.

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Fabulous recipes with just five ingredients

ST. LOUIS POST-DISPATCH
Teriyaki chicken with bok choy is one of several easy five-ingredient dishes that would be great for busy weeknights.

Simplicity is key.

Life can be difficult. It can even be daunting. When you come home from a hard day of wrangling penguins, the last thing you want to do is put together a meal with 27 different ingredients.

So you reach into the larder (does anyone even have a larder anymore? When’s the last time you saw the word “larder”?) and pull out a handful of ingredients. No more than five. And you make a meal, or at least a dish.

It may not be as complexly flavored as the one with 27 ingredients, but on the other hand, there is less to go wrong, too. It’s clean. Efficient. Simple.

Simplicity is key.

And from such simplicity can come bold flavors. I made a pot roast out of five ingredients, and it is so roundly delectable that I am calling it Five-Ingredient Bourguignon.

That may be stretching the point, but only a little. I began with a hunk of meat (top or bottom round; I used top) and I braised it until tender in red wine with onions and thyme.

The key is to cook the meat at a low simmer for a long time (mine took a little under two hours). This not only makes what is typically a tough piece of meat deliciously tender, but it also gives a chance for the acidity in the wine to mellow out as the alcohol cooks away.

It’s a breeze to make, and the result is a hearty roast, just right for a cold winter’s night.

For a side dish to stand up to the beef — or an excellent vegetarian main course — you might want to consider White Beans With Rosemary and Garlic.

Naturally, this is a dish of white beans that has been flavored with rosemary and garlic, plus olive oil and salt. But the recipe comes from Alice Waters, who revolutionized American cooking with her world-famous restaurant Chez Panisse, so you know it is going to be extra good.

And so it is. Beans, garlic and rosemary combine to bring out an almost unworldly earthiness in each other; it is a truly great grouping of flavors. It was superb.

And so was teriyaki chicken with bok choy, a dish that embarrasses me a little because it breaks an unwritten law. I generally try not to cook with premade or processed ingredients (the “Semi-Homemade” way) such as teriyaki sauce. And yet, here is a recipe calling for chicken thighs marinated in bottled teriyaki sauce and garlic, and it was wonderful.

How could it not be? The people who make bottled teriyaki sauce know what they are doing. It adds just the right sweet-spicy notes to chicken that play beautifully off the mildly bitter taste of the bok choy. Serve it on rice and you have a satisfying, easy meal.

Even faster and easier, though, is crispy-coated lemon-pepper salmon. The secret to this is lemon-pepper-flavored panko bread crumbs which, admittedly, is also sort of semi-homemade.

But they add a snap of lemon and a hint of black pepper to salmon, which goes perfectly with them. And the panko bread crumbs add a bit of texture to it, though maybe not the crunch the name implies.

The only other ingredients needed are buttermilk and melted butter, both of which help the bread crumbs adhere to the fish. It all takes the salmon, which is already great, and makes it better.

One of my favorite go-to dinners is sausage, peppers and onions, so I made it, as well. There is just something magical about the way Italian sausage blends with sauteed onion and the natural sweetness of a mild pepper.

When I make it, I usually eat it with no embellishments because it needs none. But it’s even better when it is sandwiched between two pieces of good crusty bread. I put mine in the middle of a baguette, which brought a new level to an already incredible meal.

And all of this could only be topped with dessert. vanilla pots de creme is a light vanilla custard. It’s just a gentle combination of milk — you don’t even have to use cream — sugar, egg yolks and vanilla. Cook until it’s thickened, then cook some more in a water bath to regulate the temperature.

How can something this amazing be made from only four ingredients?

FIVE-INGREDIENT BOURGUIGNON

Yield: 6 servings

2 ½ pounds beef, chuck roast, top round or bottom round

Salt

2 cups red wine

½ onion, in lengthwise slices

1 teaspoon dried thyme or 1 tablespoon chopped fresh thyme

1. Generously season beef on all sides with salt. Place meat in Dutch oven or large, heavy-bottomed pot with the wine, onion and thyme.

2. Bring to a boil, cover, lower temperature and cook at a low simmer, turning occasionally, until meat is cooked through, about 1¾ to 2 hours.

VANILLA POTS DE CREME

Yield: 4 servings

4 eggs

2 cups whole milk

3 tablespoons sugar

1 (2-inch) piece vanilla bean

1. Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Separate the eggs. In a medium bowl, whisk the yolks just enough to break them up (reserve the whites for another use). Set a strainer over a different medium heat-proof bowl. Set a kettle of water on the stove to boil.

2. Pour milk and sugar into a heavy-bottomed pot. Slice the piece of vanilla bean lengthwise and scrape the tiny seeds from each side into the milk mixture. Add the pieces of bean to the mixture, and heat the pot on medium heat, stirring occasionally to dissolve the sugar. When the milk is hot, whisk a little bit of it at a time into the egg yolks. When you have added ¼ of the milk to the yolks, pour the mixture back into the hot milk.

3. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until the mixture thickens just enough to coat the back of a spoon; if you draw your finger across the coating on the spoon you will be able to see the trail it made. Do not let the mixture boil. Remove from the heat and quickly strain into the heatproof bowl.

4. Pour the custard equally into 4 ramekins and set the ramekins in a large baking pan. Place the pan in the oven and fill the pan with the boiling water at least halfway to the level of the custard, taking care not to spill water into the custards. Cook until the sides are set but the center of the custard is still loose and jiggly, about 30 to 45 minutes. Remove the baked custards from the water to cool, then refrigerate.

SAUSAGE SANDWICH

Yield: 4 servings

1 tablespoon oil

1 bell pepper, any color, cut into strips

½ onion, cut into lengthwise strips

4 Italian sausages, pork or turkey

4 hoagie rolls or 1 baguette

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add bell pepper pieces, onion and sausage. Cover and cook, occasionally turning the sausage and stirring the vegetables, until sausage is cooked and vegetables are tender, about 15 minutes (or less, if using precooked sausage). If using pork sausage, drain off excess oil. Serve each sausage in 1 roll or ¼ baguette, smothered in peppers and onions.

TERIYAKI CHICKEN WITH BOK CHOY

Yield: 4 servings

1 clove garlic, chopped

¼ cup plus ⅓ cup teriyaki sauce

8 bone-in chicken thighs (2½ pounds)

1 cup long-grain white rice

2 bunches baby bok choy, quartered

1. Preheat oven to 450 degrees. Line a rimmed baking sheet with aluminum foil. In a large bowl, combine the garlic and ¼ cup of the teriyaki sauce. Add the chicken and marinate for 30 minutes.

2. Meanwhile, cook the rice according to the package directions.

3. Roast the chicken on the prepared baking sheet, basting with the remaining 1/3 cup of teriyaki sauce , until cooked through, 25 to 30 minutes. Add the bok choy 10 minutes before the chicken is done. Serve over rice.

CRISPY-COATED LEMON-PEPPER SALMON

Yield: 4 servings

4 tablespoons butter, divided

½ cup lemon-pepper panko bread crumbs

¼ cup buttermilk

1 (1 ½-pound) salmon fillet, cut into 4 serving pieces

Note: Can also be grilled over medium heat, covered.

1. In a small saucepan, melt 3 tablespoons of the butter. Mix with the bread crumbs. Place buttermilk in a shallow dish. Dip salmon in buttermilk and press crumb mixture evenly on top of salmon pieces.

2. Melt remaining 1 tablespoon butter in a large skillet over medium heat. Place salmon, skin-side down, on pan, cover, and cook until fish flakes easily with a fork, about 10 to 14 minutes.

WHITE BEANS WITH ROSEMARY AND GARLIC

Yield: 3 servings

2 tablespoons olive oil

2 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped

½ teaspoon fresh rosemary leaves, coarsely chopped

2 cans white beans, rinsed and drained

Salt

In a heavy-bottomed saucepan or skillet, heat oil over medium heat and add garlic and rosemary. Cook just until garlic is soft, about 2 minutes. Add the beans, taste for salt and adjust if needed. Let the dish sit for a few minutes before serving to allow the flavors to marry.