Kindness and respect: Are they lost forever?

Michelle Graham

Our world is changing at an alarming rate. I have been thinking about this a lot lately and the amount of negativity I see all around is absolutely alarming. The littlest things make us mad we lose our cool way too easy. We are looking for instant gratification in all things, at the restaurant, when we drive and even searching the world-wide web. The amount of yelling and screaming on television is sad. The news is almost always negative and condescending. Since when did we become so cold and callous and so self-absorbed? If we have a difference of opinion we cannot even have a conversation or discussion. We just yell and scream and throw a fit until we get our own way. I think there is a way to make things better and it will not happen over-night or in a month or a year but it can happen.

    Respect, if you want it than give people the respect they deserve. Start at home respect your parents, respect your teachers, respect the waitress and respect the teller at the bank. Say please and thank you. Kindness travels for miles, go out of your way to be kind to others. I send my girls off to school with a little saying each day it is simple “Be kind to yourself and be kind to others.” Practice small acts of kindness throughout your day, hold the door, buy a coffee for a friend you can even share your lunch and your time with others. None of us are perfect but I know for certain it is always the small things that we do for others that makes the biggest difference.

    Share your talent. We all have something to give. It is these times that teach us and our children the value of life. Teach your children the importance of volunteering. Do something with no intention of a reward. Give back to your community. It will make the place that you live BETTER. Volunteer opportunities are everywhere in our small town. How can you share your gifts, your time and your talent with others? Donate to organizations that make a difference in someone’s life. The donation does not have to be money, perhaps it is food for a food bank or a church. Help a neighbor with a project, perhaps offer to babysit for free. Offering a helping hand not a hand out has great value and rewards for both parties involved. It goes back to kindness, sprinkle it like confetti and it will certainly spread like wild fire.

    Perhaps this way of thinking is too singular too simple. If you think that one person or one act of kindness cannot change others think again. Think of the single mother who just needs a smile or an encouraging hello. Can you be the person to give her that? Or the busy person who has just dropped everything they have on the ground. Can you help them pick it up? Offer to help with no expectation of being rewarded. We can all do these small things. Let someone ahead of you in line just because. Be kind and do the right thing every chance you get. The rewards are endless. Be this example to others. Instead of picking a fight find a way to be the peace keeper. Instead of engaging in negative talk speak kindly about others and to others. It can be amazing the ripple effect this can have, but it has to start with you, the one and only you.

    I think of summer as this beautiful season of growth and transformation. Think of all the ways that you can impact others and ways to find personal growth for yourself. Kindness truly can start with you and the positive influence you can have on others can be transcending. Lead in life by example, find every way that you can to sprinkle love and friendship. It is with these acts that all the negativity in life can be lifted and then we can find our life renewed.

Stop Thinking Start Doing

Michelle Graham

Are you someone who thinks about making changes in your life?  Wow, the possibility to change is endless.  What is your 2017 plan for a positive, meaningful year? Is your goal to take college classes, learn how to quilt, get healthy or just become a better, more focused, more driven person. Whatever the dream, the goal, the doing, the planning has to start from within. You have heard the quote or a derivative of it “If you can dream it you can become it.”  Well now is your big chance to be and do all that you can be in 2017. No matter the goal big or small what path will you forge to get there?

                I personally like plans!  I like writing them out, I like keeping lists and then crossing things off my list. Anyone who knows me or who has taken our YMCA Diabetes Prevention Program has heard me say 100 or more times “when you have a plan you have everything.” This holds true not just with getting healthy or making improvements in eating, but with many situations or goals in life. Big LOFTY plans are not necessary; it is the little plans, the attention to small details that make the difference.

                Start at the beginning, be specific and describe your goal accordingly.  If you don’t know where you have been, how can you know where you are going? Think about your goal, perhaps document what you like about it and what brought you to this place of change.  Reflection is the key to progress and making your goal an evolving blueprint is the key. Determine what the goal is, define it and then set some short and long-term goals to coincide with the proposed goal. Now what is your plan to achieve that goal?  Are you going to take some chances to get there and will you go out on a limb to really make it happen? Get uncomfortable and begin to push yourself in a way that perhaps takes you out of your comfort level. This is where true inner growth, awareness and innate change can happen.  Be open to the amazing possibilities that can come and most important be open to changing your behavior.

                Not everything always goes according to our master plan. You will need to be patient, be open to a bump in the road. The bump can lead you to places you never imagined.  Learn from the bump and then adapt and adjust the blueprint.  It is these times, these moments, that can really move the needle in the direction we long to go. 

                Most important, adapt and re-evaluate the route chosen. Don’t get stuck, continue to progress forward and stay focused on the prize, the end result.  Keep those goals challenging, specific, positive and flexible. Continue to challenge yourself through this journey of discovery. Try something new; take a class just for the pure sake of learning. Keep your goal short, to the point and specific. This is how you will get to where you are going. Your blueprint needs to be precise and to the point.  Instead of focusing on making a change in 10 different things focus on just one or two items. Next, we spend far too much time putting ourselves down, living in a world of “could haves” and “would haves.”  Instead radiate positivity, spend some time celebrating all the great amazing changes that you have made so far.  Write them all down and then celebrate, I mean really find joy in your progress and the changes that you have made so far. Being positive and kind to your self is vital; you never know how your attitude can impact someone else. Last, be flexible, be open and learn to be free from the things that hold you back from being where you really want to go. 

                The enjoyment isn’t always in the destination; it is most often the journey itself that brings joy and contentment. What will your 2017 journey look like? Will you decide to get out of your comfort level and check off some things on your bucket list? Don’t wait for an opportunity to seize the beautiful, quiet moments and make your mark and leave your stamp today. 

YMCA opens facility in Sackets Harbor

ymca_blu_rgb_r

 

By MARCUS WOLF
MWOLF@WDT.NET

The Watertown Family YMCA will use the former Madison Barracks Health Club owned by Lawler Realty LLC to open a satellite facility early next year.

Steve N. Rowell, executive director of health and wellness at the Y, said the facility, at 119 Pike Road, will offer programs similar to the Watertown and Carthage facilities and potentially create new programs to meet local demand. The Y and Lawler Realty reached an agreement in October that will require the Y to pay only utility bills, taxes and interest.

“It’s one of the best things to happen to Sackets in a long time,” Mayor Vincent J. Battista said.

The Y will incorporate a full fitness center with family wellness programming and multiple youth and senior activity programs at the former health club.

Mr. Rowell said the Y will offer its preventive care program for senior citizens and its after-school child care program, which it offers at Sackets Harbor Central School, at the new facility. The Y also considered using its access to Lake Ontario to create watersport activities to accompany its youth sports programs. Members will have access to the facility’s gymnasium, weight room, locker rooms and cardio equipment. The Y has not determined its hours of operation.

“We will also offer a group exercise room with many different exercise classes,” Mr. Rowell said. “It would really just be an extension of our services out of the Watertown YMCA.”

To preserve the facility and accommodate his new tenant, Michael A. Lawler, owner of Lawler Realty, completed multiple interior and exterior renovations for the facility.

Mr. Lawler said his contractors have built a new roof, replaced the doors, repaired and painted the walls, repaved the road and installed new windows, lights, carpet and ceramic tile flooring since last summer. Lawler Realty received a $500,000 grant loan commitment from the Development Authority of the North Country to help finance the $600,000 project in July. Mr. Lawler said he expects the contractors and construction workers will finish most of the renovations by Jan. 1 if he receives funding from the grant loan commitment next week, with only some additional masonry work in the spring and brick work in the summer.

“It’s functioning right along,” Mr. Lawler said.

Lawler Realty purchased the former health club in 2010 from Madison Barracks Associates, which operated the facility from 1993 to 2005. Mr. Battista said the club closed about nine years ago.

“I hope that we as a community can help support” it, he said, “and make it an important part of our community.”

Summer 2016: Wellness

Tread lightly for summer fun

Take steps to ensure children are safe around water

Michelle Graham

Michelle Graham

Summer lends itself to fun in the sun and all things wonderful and warm. Boating, swimming and relaxing by the beach or a pool are special highlights that make lasting summer memories. The warm season in Northern New York is short so we pack a lot into a narrow window of time. [Read more…]

Winter 2016 Cover Story: Family Health and Wellness

A foundation for health & wellness

Ryder Blackburn, 6, jokes with classmates as they make a fruit parfait during Kids in the Kitchen cooking class at Calcium Primary School last month. Programs like Kids in the Kitchen aim to instill lasting healthy habits in children so they don’t carry unhealthy habits into adulthood. Photo by Stephen Swofford, NNY Living.

Ryder Blackburn, 6, jokes with classmates as they make a fruit parfait during Kids in the Kitchen cooking class at Calcium Primary School last month. Programs like Kids in the Kitchen aim to instill lasting healthy habits in children so they don’t carry unhealthy habits into adulthood. Photo by Stephen Swofford, NNY Living.

Families should strive to make fitness a lasting habit for the future

By Karee Magee, NNY Living

While leading a healthy lifestyle may seem to be easier said than done in today’s busy society as parents juggle work and family, the problem might be the way health and wellness is viewed. [Read more…]

5 Things Friday events calendar – Sept. 4

Happy Friday!

[Just click an event for more details.]

Performances

1. Maybe You're Not the Worst Thing Ever

When: 8 p.m. Friday.
Where: Central New York Playhouse, ShoppingTown Mall, 3649 Erie Blvd. E., Syracuse.
What: With husband and wife stars Korrie and Josh Taylor.
Cost: $12.
INFO: Central New York Playhouse, 885-8960.

Friday / Syracuse

2. Don't Feed The Actors

When: Dinner, 6:30 p.m., show, 8 p.m. Saturday.
Where: Central New York Playhouse, ShoppingTown Mall, 3649 Erie Blvd. E., Syracuse.
What: Featuring Syracuse longest-running improv comedy troupe.
Cost: Dinner and show, $25; show only, $12.
INFO: Central New York Playhouse, 885-8960.

Saturday / Syracuse

3. David Kim benefit concert

When: 2 p.m. Sunday.
Where: View Arts Center, 3273 Route 28, Old Forge.
What: Benefits the center’s performing arts department.
Cost: $15; members, $12.
INFO: View Arts Center, 369-6411.

Sunday / Old Forge

4. The Seagull

When: 8 p.m. Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m. Sunday.
Where: Pendragon Theatre, 15 Brandy Brook Ave., Saranac Lake.
What: A new take on Chekhov’s play.
Cost: $30 ; ages 65 and older, $27; students with ID, $20 ; matinee shows, $15.
INFO: Pendragon Theare, (518) 891-1854.

All weekend / Saranac Lake

5. The Scintas

When: 9 p.m. Friday through Sunday.
Where: Bonnie Castle Resort & Marina, 31 Holland St., Alexandria Bay.
What: Featuring one of the most successful acts on the Las Vegas strip.
Cost: $30 to $45; dinner tickets, $47.50.
INFO: Bonnie Castle Resort & Marina, 482-4511 or 800-955-4511; Facebook event page.

All weekend / Alexandria Bay

Community

1. Twentieth annual Antique Car Show

When: 10 a.m. Saturday.
Where: Amvets Post 262, 5082 County Route 56, Colton.
What: Registration slated for 10 a.m. Several classes available. Prizes, crafts, vendors, food, beverages and games.
Cost: Call for details.
INFO: Amvets, 262-2507.

Saturday / Colton

2. Busted Grapes Winery grand opening

When: 11 a.m.  to 6 p.m. Saturday.
Where: Busted Grapes Winery, Corner of State Route 126 and Ball Road., Black River.
What: Six varieties of wine made from New York State grapes available.
Cost: Call for details.
INFO: Busted Grapes Winery, 519-7574 or bustedgrapes@yahoo.com.

Saturday / Black River

3. Eddy's Caribbean Cuisine celebration

When: Noon  to 6 p.m. Saturday.
Where: Eddy’s Caribbean Cuisine, 126 Franklin St., Watertown.
What: Includes live music.
Cost: Menu samples, $1 each.
INFO: Eddy’s Caribbean Cuisine, 863-7778.[/expand

Saturday / Watertown

4. Chicken barbecue and bake sale When: Noon to 4 p.m. Sunday.
Where: Walmart, 25737 U.S. Route 11, Evans Mills.
What: Benefits Indian River Pop Warner football.
Cost: Dependent on item.
INFO: Facebook event page.

Sunday / Evans Mills

5. The Great New York State Fair

When: Gates open at 8 a.m. each day.
Where: New York State Fairgrounds, 601 State Fair Boulevard, Syracuse.
What: Friday: Traditional Six Nations Dancers, 1 p.m.; The Ripcords, 2 p.m.; and Fifth Harmony, 8 p.m.; Saturday: TBA, 2 p.m.; and The Jacksons, 8 p.m.; Sunday: R5, 2 p.m.; and Steve Miller Band, 8 p.m. Grandstand concerts and events: Sunday, Sept. 6:P Demolition Derby, 1 p.m.; Monster Truck Show Party, 6 to 7 p.m.; All Star Monster Truck Show and Freestyle Motocross, 7:30 p.m. Cost: $25 (includes both shows); party in the pit, $5.
Cost: Daily admission, $10.
INFO: The Great New York State Fair, 487-7711.

All weekend / Syracuse

For a good cause

1. Lowville Food Pantry annual garage sale

When: 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Where: 5502 Trinity Ave., Lowville.
What: Benefits food pantry.
INFO: Lowville Food Pantry, 376-7431.

Friday & Saturday / Lowville

2. Watertown blood drive

When: 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday.
Where: Fairgrounds YMCA, 585 Rand Drive, Watertown.
What: Run by the Red Cross.
INFO: Red Cross, 800-RED-CROSS.

Saturday / Watertown

3. Adams blood drive

When: 8:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday.
Where: American Legion Post 586, 10 S. Main St., Adams.
What: Run by the Red Cross.
INFO: Red Cross, 800-RED-CROSS.

Saturday / Adams

4. Carthage Lions Club can and bottle drive

When: 10 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Saturday.
Where: The Church Street Diner, 107 Church St., Carthage.
What: Sponsored by Carthage Lions Club.
INFO: Carthage Lions Club.

Saturday / Carthage

5. Benefit for Joey Chapman

When: 11 a.m. Saturday.
Where: Mud Puppy Bait Shop, 6732 Pine Grove Road, Glenfield.
What: Food, 50/50 raffles, silent auction, bake sale. Proceeds to be used for medical and funeral expenses for Joey’s wife, Tina.
INFO: Muddy Puppy Bait Shop, 376-3047.

Saturday / Glenfield

Art

1. Opening reception: Re-imagine

When: 5 to 7 p.m. Friday.
Where: Adirondack Artists Guild, 52 Main St., Saranac Lake.
What: Drawings and mixed media images by Suzanne Langelier-Lebeda slated for display through Wednesday, Sept. 30.
Cost: Free.
INFO: Suzanne Langelier-Lebeda; Adirondack Artists Guild, (518) 891-2615.

Friday / Saranac Lake

2. Opening reception: The Other Eye

When: 5 to 7 p.m. Friday.
Where: NorthWind Fine Arts, 11 Woodruff St., Saranac Lake.
What: Work of Cat Micheels and Catherine Hartung slated for display through Wednesday, Sept. 30.
Cost: Call for details.
INFO: NorthWind Fine Arts, (518) 354-1875.

Friday / Saranac Lake

3. Opening reception: 3 Artist Unchained

When: 5 to 8 p.m. Friday.
Where: Old Forge Library, 220 Crosby Blvd, Old Forge.
What: Featuring work by sculptress Suzanne Mulvihill Firsching, painter Stephen Fletcher and sculptor and painter Albert Casatelli. Exhibit slated to run through Wednesday, Sept. 30.
Cost: Call for details.
INFO: Old Forge Library, 369-6008.

Friday / Old Forge

4. Ruth Haley Collection of Postcards

When: 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Friday and Saturday.
Where: Potsdam Public Museum, 2 Park St., Potsdam.
What: Circa United States, Europe and South America from 1930s to 1970s, slated for exhibit through Tuesday, Dec. 1.
Cost: Suggested $1 donation.
INFO: Potsdam Public Museum, 265-6910.

Friday & Saturday / Potsdam

5. Plein air paint out and art auction

When: Friday and Saturday.
Where: Paint out throughout Old Forge; Auction slated for 5:30 p.m. Saturday at View Arts Center, 3273 state Route 28, Old Forge.
What: Paint out slated for Thursday through Saturday.
INFO: View Arts Center, 369-6411.

Friday & Saturday / Old Forge

Festivals

1. Farm 2 Fork Festival

When: 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday.
Where: Riverside Park, Saranac Lake.
What: Vendors slated to show from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.; food tasting stations open, 11 a.m.; music, noon; food art judging, 1:30 p.m.
Cost: Tasting ticket, $15, allows “free-range graze” at stations of your choice.
INFO: Farm 2 Fork; (518) 586-1063.

Saturday / Saranac Lake

2. Upstate Comic Con

When: Noon to 8 p.m. Saturday.
Where: Louisville Arena, 44 Arena Drive, Chase Mills.
What: Collectible card game tournaments, panels, special guests, art and cosplay contests, comic book vendors. Benefits Massena Boys and Girls Club.
Cost: $12; VIP, $20.
INFO: Casondra Arquitte, 296-4447; Facebook event page.

Saturday / Chase Mills

3. Blues at the winery

When: 2 to 6 p.m. Saturday.
Where: Thousand Islands Winery, 43298 Seaway Ave., Alexandria Bay.
What: Live bands, wine and beer, wine tastings, tours.
Cost: Free admission.
INFO: TI Winery, 482-9306.

Saturday / Alexandria Bay

4. Skewed Brew Fest

When: 2 to 7 p.m. Saturday.
Where: Madison Barracks Polo Field, Sackets Harbor.
What: Live music by Annie in the Water and Harrison B.
Cost: Free admission.
INFO: Skewed Brewing, 788-2337.

Saturday / Sackets Harbor

5. Hobofest

When: Noon Sunday.
Where: Riverside Park, Saranac Lake.
What: Showcase of American roots-style music. Featuring Kaatskillachia and Mike & Ruthy Band.
Cost: Free admission.
INFO: Hobofest, 523-5842.

Sunday / Saranac Lake

Need more to do? Check out the Watertown Daily Times events calendar.

Spring 2015 Cover Story: Health and wellness trends

Discover new paths to wellness

Fitness students participate in rip class, a music-driven barbell and dumbell workout, at the Watertown Family YMCA. Incorporating a diverse range of physical activity while eating a diet low in processed sugars and full of fresh fruits and vegetables is but one strategy on the path to wellness. Photo by Justin Sorensen, NNY Living.

Fitness students participate in rip class, a music-driven barbell and dumbell workout, at the Watertown Family YMCA. Incorporating a diverse range of physical activity while eating a diet low in processed sugars and full of fresh fruits and vegetables is but one strategy on the path to wellness. Photo by Justin Sorensen, NNY Living.

Make 2015 the year for a total health makeover

By Lorna Oppedisano, NNY Living 

Health and wellness in 2015 are all about balance, knowing one’s body and being aware of what’s going into it, both in terms of nutrition and conditioning. The trends boil down to arming oneself with knowledge and being honest with oneself. [Read more…]

Five Things Friday – March 13

Happy Friday! The air’s a little warmer. Our hearts a little lighter. And the world is just a little greener.

[Just click each event for more info.]

Everyone’s a little Irish at the north country’s 30th annual Irish Festival.

[Read more…]

Five Things Friday – Feb. 27

Happy Friday! February’s coming to an end. Make the most of the end of the season!

[Just click an event title to see more details.] [Read more…]

Original Turkey Trot runner crosses finish line at 91

More than 1,100 Watertown community members turned out Thanksgiving morning for the YMCA Turkey Trot 5k run and 2.2-mile walk, including a 91-year-old runner who helped organize the first event more than 30 years ago.

Warren R. Bonney, 91, stood out from the pack as he and his longtime running buddy, William R. Mattingly, took to the 2.2-mile course. Mr. Mattingly pushed Mr. Bonney’s wheelchair through the slush, snow and puddles.

The 2014 Turkey Trot participants started the run at the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Participants did a lap around the block with an extended course for runners.

Mr. Bonney was took part in organizing the first Turkey Trot more than 30 years ago. Mr. Mattingly said he and Mr. Bonney participated in the 5k together with friends and family. Mr. Mattingly, 71, said it’s been years since he has run the half marathon, but he walks — and neither he nor Mr. Bonney are ready to slow down.

“I do more hiking, biking, walking, and canoeing now,” said Mr. Mattingly. He said he is an Adirondack 46er and stays active with his grandchildren, going on long hiking trips.

Mr. Bonney said he has participated in the Turkey Trot every year since it began, though in the last few years he has had to slow down and walk with his daughter, who had a wheelchair available in case he needed a break. Mr. Mattingly said he planned to play it by ear and see what Mr. Bonney wanted to do: walk, push himself or be pushed along the route.

The first person across the finish line was Matthew Cheney, 22, of Beaver Falls, with a time of 16:15. The first female finisher was Brittany Burns, 26, Watertown, who finished the run in 18:18.

Mr. Bonney, who decided at the last block he wanted to walk, stood behind his wheelchair as he crossed the finish line with fellow Trot participants cheering for “number 31.”

“A year ago, the doctor said I might have arthritis,” said Mr. Bonney. “It’s been a year, and I’m still going.”

Mr. Bonney said he was glad it stopped snowing on Thursday morning, but weather hasn’t stopped him before. One year they ran it in a blizzard, another year through inches of slush trying to slow the runners and walkers down.

He said he plans to participate in another run on New Years Day.

Some runners and walkers wore turkey hats and shorts. Parents toted infants in baby carriers on their chests, and some pushed children in strollers with their canine companions leashed to their sides.

All the participants had crossed the finish line by 10 a.m., giving everyone ample time to get home and put together their Thanksgiving dinners.

“Our goal was to have a good time, burn some awesome calories and eat up some more awesome calories,” said Monica R. Ward. Ms. Ward is a first-time walker who pushed her young daughter in a stroller through the course.

Nancy Catalina and her two children, Jenelle and Jacob, said the Turkey Trot has become a Thanksgiving tradition for their family.

“After the run,” Jenelle said, “we have an excuse to eat all day.”

 

 

By Katherine Clark Ross, Times Staff Writer